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First, I'm sorry if this is vulgar, but it seems that my mom's unit shaves the residents' pubic hair. I'm not bothered by this, I actually think it's cleaner, but no one ever mentioned that it happens and I'm wondering if this is a common practice at other nursing homes.


In case it matters, my mom is in a long term dementia unit where most residents wear diapers. Thanks.

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I just have to share this - it's a story I've shared before about my mom, but MsMadge just put me in mind of it.

Mom and I were watching TV one night here at home, and there was a commercial on for a new tv show, where a 40-something woman masquerades as a 20-something woman in order to get a particular job. She makes friends with her young co-workers, never letting on how old she is. In one of the commercials, the 40-something is with two of the 20-something co-workers at the gym in the locker room, and they're all getting undressed to shower or change. The two younger women drop their undies, and the older one does the same - to gasps of horror from the younger ones.
20-Something #1: "OMG! Don't you WAX?!?!"
20-Something #2: "OMG - it looks like my MOTHER'S....."

Mom looks at me and says, "I think mine's gone BALD!"

I had never, ever heard Mom make reference to body parts like that....I just about fell off my chair laughing.

Anyway, not trying to stray from the topic, just trying to bring a smile to your face. I hope you get to the bottom of the shaving. Do come back and let us know what you find out.
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And, any grow back typically itches like mad with many ingrown hairs.

Not that I'd know personally. But this is what a friend told me.
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I've never heard of this practice. I would definitely ask the staff if this is normal and to see the written policy explaining why it's done.
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I have never heard of this and would be outraged if done without permission- sharing razors and all could lead to infection plus elderly women tend to not have much hair down there anyway
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I thought my mothers pubic hair had been shaved off but it turned out that it had stopped growing . I had just previously never seen her down there before... actually all her body hair stopped growing- it turns out this was natural for elderly.
Obviously if this isnt your case please disregard this answer.
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If you have not seen your mother's nether regions for some time, it may be that her pubic hair stopped growing. Check to see if they are actually shaving. My family has full heads of hair, but with age every place else goes to bald or close to it.
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I understand why they do it. I would think a close trim would be easier and preferred to a shave, to prevent any skin irritation. I've heard others say their elders don't have hair in that area but my 103 yo grandmother still did have her hair there. To help with keeping clean and preventing UTIs, I trimmed her hair. I did it instinctively, not knowing it was a practice, because I could see how sitting in urine or feces would be more easily cleaned up if the area doesn't have hair. I've never heard of the practice in a care facility, but I think it's a worthwhile practice.
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Thank you, Colene. Rainman is a sweet, gentle, loving young man who is continually teaching me to try to be the best version of myself. Most days I think I'm the lucky one.
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When I started bathing my Mom, I noticed that she had gone bald there and I guarantee no shaving is involved. As a joke said, "as I grow older, I don't seem to grow as much hair on my legs and underarms; it's too busy growing on my chin and in my nose and ears." Maybe this is similar.
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I have never heard of this and I think it is horrible. There is absolutely no reason someone cannot be kept clean, just as you don't need to shave your head in order to have a clean scalp. Anyone incontinent should never be left long enough for it to be "dried on", that is simply bad care. I have worked as bedside RN for 45 years, including a stint as Director of Nursing in a NH. This simply should not be done.
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