Where can I find activities and stimulation for a blind and deaf elderly person?

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How can I find stimulation for my bored mother who cannot see or hear? My mother is 92-years-old and lives alone.

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Suggestions:
1. If the person is not completely deaf, a good set of headphones can make listening to music or audio books enjoyable again. Sennheiser is one brand we use.
2. Chores to help around the house: folding laundry, polishing silver, kneading bread, stringing beans, sorting socks by feel, brushing pets, etc.
3. Dictating knowledge into a recording device: family recipes, geneology information, childhood memories, gardening tips, life lessons, advice for young people, singing songs from their youth, etc.
4. tactile crafts such as knitting, weaving, macrame, clay work, paying musical instrument into a recording software, etc.
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95 year old man has dementia, blind and can hardly hear. He has anxiety due to not seeing. I'm his caregiver and it is difficult as he wants me with him every minute of the day. A hired person from a agency is with him every night so I can get some sleep. He wakes up and demands that I get up also. What can I do. These people do not put their family member in a home.
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I am trying to find an assisted living site for my father who is Deaf/Blind , I want him closer to me in Austin Texas. Please help us.
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I have searched this site and many others for inspiration on how to occupy my mother. Playing games with her or taking her out for walks or even folding laundry are common suggestions, but at best occupy less than an hour of her day, and at worst she rejects the whole idea before we even begin. She is not interested in talking books any more, and it is hard to find simple PG rated stories that she can still follow although she used to enjoy them years ago. TV is definitely out unless I can find a documentary and there are is not much worth tuning in to.
It is sad that her only outlet has become moving from bed to chair and back again, with a little music along the way (as long as she will keep her hearing aids in anyway)
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as far as places to go or things to do for the deafblind it all depends where you live!!!
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as a deafblind individual being her age of 92 it will be hard to teach her american sign language tactualy or not as well as braille due to both of those being brand new communication forms she would need to learn. if she lives alone and still has that independence more power to her! i completley understand how hard it is to find activites for seniors whom are deafblind as that is my main client base. i would suggest purley tactile things and as someone else said something using her residual senses to her advantage... if she has some residual hearing- anything to do with sound or music, if she has residual vision adapt activites to her visual needs for example: if she has light perseption only= create a dark room with fiber or led lights and it could be very relaxing, if she has more usable vision than keep adapting. if she is total total something textured like a sand and water table or floam or even clay! another helpfull thing is to look up making a calender system so she knows what her day is going to look like and she wont be bored becasue she can anticipate whats coming next and when she has that doctors appointment ect.. you can even make that tactile by using puff paint so everyting is raised , and or different textures or shapes she can feel for different activites during the day!.. hope this helps some. i am a trained deafblind intervenor
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My husband and I will soon be caregivers for his deaf-blind brother. (Provided the institution he is in will release him to us. They are making it very difficult, I think, so they can get his check every month). So, where do we go for tactile sign language classes? Are there community agencies that will help?
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I am happy to know that I am not the only one in this situation. My husband is 80 and has very little hearing or vision. I so often feel that I am failing, because I can't think of things to keep him motivated. Now I don't feel so bad, since even the professionals are challenged. Realistically, I know this is a universal issue, but I can't help but feel sorry for him. Bless his heart, he never complains, except that he can't do more for me. It would be wonderful if "social security" offered us both a social and secure lifestyle, thus a happier and healthier life.
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I am also in the same situation. My mother is 80 & she is deaf since 5 and blind since 60. She lives with me & I am also disabled. Lucky it is not my hearing or sight but physical. I know my mother is bored & I don't know what to do to occupy her time. When I am cooking or baking I have her mix the batter. She needs more, it is starting to affect her mind, the inactivity. Any ideas?
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May I interject to some of the less helpful responses on here? My mother-in-law is 86 and deaf/blind, it isn't always possible or practical to move people into your own home in order to care for them, i.e. if you have to work for a living, there is no recompense to help financially if you give up work, she may not want to move from her own home, a lot of elderly refuse to move in with relatives for many reasons, it is also possible that due to several factors during childhood, it is the last thing you want to have your parent living with you, not everyone has had the ideal parents raising them, it is unfair to try and reprimand someone whose circumstance you know nothing about, suffice that they are trying to deal with a very dfificult situation rather than put their elderly into a home out of the way completely!!!!!
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