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This is not acceptable!!
First - she shouldn't be "crunched over in a chair", there are good supportive tilt in place wheelchairs, or geri chairs that can allow her to comfortably recline, nothing makes my blood boil like seeing people stuck in inappropriate simple wheelchairs!
At night there is no reason she can't be in bed, although rails and restraints aren't allowed there are several other things that can be done to minimize her risks:
*lowering the bed and placing fall mats on the floor
*bed alarms
*mattress covers with "wings" that discourage getting up
like this.....https://www.spinlife.com/Drive-Medical-Defined-Perimeter-Mattress-Cover-Fall-Prevention/spec.cfm?productID=113093

Aside from quality of life concerns sitting in the same position day and night puts her at high risk for pressure ulcers, in fact if I were you I would be checking that she doesn't already have one.
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I totally agree. This situation is incredibly sad.
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You know, it’s so sad. Restraints are not allowed. Not even bed rails because of mishaps that have occurred but people use bed rails at home all the time. They are commonly sold on amazon. People who have Parkinson’s or other mobility issues use them to help maneuver getting in or out of bed.

My mom with Parkinson’s disease had one on her bed in our house. At the nursing home for rehab they did not allow it. So mom had a really hard time getting in and out of bed.

Awhile back though, end of life hospice facilities allowed restraints because my brother had to be restrained.

I personally don’t feel like a bed rail should even be considered a restraint. We put babies in cribs. Some elderly people become as helpless as babies.

Best wishes to you. I hope that you are able to find a suitable solution. It’s sad that she can’t stretch out in a bed instead of being forced to remain in a wheelchair.

What about sores? Is she sitting on the recommended cushion because if not her skin will break down and she will have to deal with sores.

Sores need to be treated to heal and are painful. I would look into that. Just remember the elderly get embarrassed. That generation is extremely modest.
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kdfo90 Mar 2020
Great reply. I agree that rails should not be considered restraints. Just about anything is preferable to having your loved one fall and break a hip and/or get a brain bleed. When my father was in a nursing home, I finally understood the practice of having them sitting in chairs in the halls -- there simply was never enough staff to constantly monitor the patients if they were semi-mobile! I don't know the solution, but your remark about bed sores was right on. It happens so easily, and usually in places that we don't think to look at.
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Patients can no longer be restrained nor can they have bars on their beds. Nursing homes usually have beds that lower almost to the floor and put down rubber mats around the floor in case the patient rolls off. Please meet with the nursing home and discuss this issue.
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Juaticedog Mar 2020
Thanks for your response. My husband is flying up there to participate in a care plan meeting tomorrow. I knew restraints were bad. We were thinking of suggesting the bed rails. We understand the reason they keep her out there is to prevent falls. I wasn’t able to come up with an alternative. Maybe I’d the has some weight shift sensor that would alert them that she’s trying to get up.
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