How do I notify credit cards that there is no estate money to pay them now that my parents have passed?

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My mom ran up a cc balance to $20,000 in the past year. I made the monthly payments out of her ss before she passed. Now, after funeral home I have about $1000 left from her life insurance. There is no equity in her home, and I still have insurance and utilities to be paid. Who do I pay?

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I had a very similar situation when my dad died. He also had a couple of outstanding credit card balances. I called his creditors to inform them that my dad had died and that there was no estate. One of them simply said that they would notate the account and I never heard from them again and the other requested a copy of the death certificate which I sent. I never heard from them after that either.

As long as your name is not on any of your mom's credit card accounts you shouldn't have any problem.
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Credit cards are unsecured debt. A person who is deceased cannot pay this kind of debt and I would send a copy of the death certificate to all of them. If you were acting as her attorney-in-fact and feel you deserve compensation, then pay yourself and notify the other creditors of her death and see how they respond. Just in case, don't give your private information to them. I am sorry for your loss, and know your mother is in a better place.
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Do as Eyerishlass did. If any of the credit cards are with Bank of America or Capital One, send a certified or registered letter notifying them of your mother's death. Those two card issuers are more difficult to deal with, so document all your actions if your mother had cards from them.

Advise them she is deceased and that there are no funds for payment on her debt. Don't mention anything about yourself or they'll come after you and harass you - I know of people who've had real problems with these two outfits.

Have you also notified the credit reporting bureaus of her death? I did this after both my mother and sister died not only for update purposes but so that any attempts to obtain credit in their names could be immediately identified as fraudulent.

Pay the bills that are necessary to maintain her house until you sell or otherwise dispose of it. Be aware that you may have some difficulty with the insurance agent and carrier if you're not living in your mother's house - underwriters aren't fond of insuring vacant homes.
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Sorry to hear of your loss. The advice above about contacting creditors is correct. However, I would respectfully disagree with the suggestions about paying yourself. Once a person dies, the power of attorney is invalid and gives no authority at all. In many states, the payment for those services is not permitted unless documented in writing before death. All states have a strict order of payment of creditors and costs of estate administration. If someone pays money out of order, that person can become personally liable, even if they were not otherwise. For example, it is often assumed that the funeral bill has first priority, when that's not generally true (at least not to an unlimited amount).
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That is true, unless your name was on the card, you are not responsible. Just call them and tell them your mom has passed. Sorry you lost your mother.
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Do not forget to notify the three credit bureaus so no one can use her info for fraudulent activity.
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I don't know the answer, but wish to offer condolences. You are brave to deal with all this while grieving!
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Don't skip this. If you were acting as her attorney-in-fact and feel you deserve compensation, then pay yourself
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When my FIL died, with many outstanding debts, my husband, who was his executor, paid EVERYBODY. Including, but not limited to a dentist who KNEW dad had passed, but still made the dentures dad had ordered just prior to his death. $1200. My hubby felt obligated to clear all debts. Also, as executor, he was allowed to charge $25 per hour for the time he spent on the estate. (My son is a lawyer and checked all this out for us, for our state). I completely renovated dad's condo so it could sell quickly (and it was in bad shape)..I also was entitled to the $25 per hour for my time. Just to remain on good terms with the sibs, we did not charge the estate anything. In the end, we were "shorted" thousands and thousands of dollars, but for my hubby, being on good terms with family was more important. I know that my hubby did get about 15 death certificates and sent those along with final payments to CC companies, etc. It was a learning curve, for sure. We won't leave our kids like dad left us--floundering for answers and direction.

BillKratt--each state has different laws about the executor being paid. Where we live, it's a flat hour amount. If it were a lawyer doing it, you'd better believe they'd be charging every second. Just because my hubby didn't take advantage of it--doesn't mean that's right for everyone. He spent countless hours on cleaning up dad's affairs. The other kids just held out their hands for checks. (Yeah, I am a tad bitter about THAT.)
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Be very careful about giving out private info. There are crooks out there that run collection agencies that don't practice a very nice way. I can personally tell you, years ago, I was pregnant and had one child already. I went to the Collection Companies office as they had threatened to call my husband boss. Well, they got me in a room and shut the door. The rest is history. The Govt came after that company and we never heard from them again. But, they will harass you if they get your tele number etc.
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