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He is so frail don’t know how he does this.


Dad has PDD and had great day yesterday but at times he goes into this mantis walking and can’t sit down for long, why? What do I need to do? He is at a behavioral unit and has been there for couple weeks. He was doing this on off for the last 3 months but they don’t act like there is anything’s to be done.


If they don’t know I sure don’t, but something needs to be done he is eating well but losing weight from the walking.


What approach do I take with doctors?

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There are several "pacers" at our local nursing home: K almost never stops, even for meals, because she needs to get home to her children, J is obviously looking for something and will often pause to check out a fascinating (to him) picture or wander in and out of people's rooms, S moves a little slower and can be heard whispering " I'm so afraid" as she walks, and when she first came to live there S2 almost ran frantically searching for a way out - occasionally one or more of the others will join them as they prowl up and down the halls.

Talk to his doctor to see if there might be a medication that could help calm him down without increasing the risk of falls, and ask about adding a supplement to his diet to boost calories. Good Luck.
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Thank you
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There are no definitive tests or rules for what’s called Sundowning, but it sounds like that’s what he’s doing. Technically, Sundowning isn’t supposed” to happen until dusk or late in the afternoon. But, as we caregivers know, the first rule of dementia is that there are no rules. And,with this disease, since there in no cure, doctors have to treat the symptoms and behaviors and not the actual disease. Dad must be having anxiety attacks.

The adage, “if you see something, say something” holds true here. Call an official meeting. I’m assuming you are on Dad’s HIPPA papers? Tell them you want to discuss Dad’s prognosis and current behaviors and what their plan of treatment is. Take notes. Ask what to watch for. Ask for what to expect. You have the right to know what’s going on. Don’t accept quick responses from busy medical staff, told in passing in the hall. He’s your dad and you have the right to be in on his care plan.
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