My mother will not use her walker correctly going down ramps. Is there a right way to go down a ramp?

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My mom is 85 and uses a three-wheeled walker for stability for her severe balance problems. She does not have pain problems or support issues with her joints or back. Her problem is that she can't let go of something to stabilize her all the time. When she goes down a ramp, she insists on holding on to the railing on the right and using her left to guide her walker down the ramp. She refuses to just use the walker only as she says using the brakes cause her arthritic hands to ache. We just had ramps installed in her house, but she wants one removed. She can't go in or out of her door in the garage because of this condition, but I can't make her do it right. What is the right way to go down a ramp? She can go up just fine when she only uses the walker, but today I saw her doing the one-handed thing. Should I give up and take out the ramps?

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I agree with Garden. Have her doctor order a round of therapy in her home. The therapist can work with her to feel comfortable with the ramp.
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This is something I've been thinking about as I want to get ramps for my father's porch and bedroom exit. But I also know from when I've walked down inclines that I need to slow down, watch my posture and balance carefully, and hold onto a rail. This was more so after I fell on a ramp at my father's house and injured my left foot.

I can't imagine the anxiety and discomfort someone with balance or mobility issues must feel on ramps.

I don't know the right way to go down a ramp, but I think your mother's need to hold onto a rail is a reflection of her need, and I think common sense, to have something stable to hold onto. A walker can move or fall and isn't as stable as a rail.

This is something I've been wondering about as well.

I would think a physical or occupational therapist would be more appropriately a source of advising of proper ramp use.

I wouldn't take out the ramps; I'd try to find out what therapists would recommend. I've wondered about putting treads on ramps; that might the feet to grip the ramp.
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