Medicare supplement and medigap travel outside of US. Anyone experience this?

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Hi all...


I currently have a high-deductible Plan F medigap policy. As with all Plan F policies, travel outside the US is covered with an annual $250 deductible, and 80% of eligible expenses are paid up to a lifetime maximum of $50,000. Coverage is provided for the first 60 days of a trip outside the US.


I've been searching for more information on that last item.. the 60-day limitation of coverage. I haven't been able to find out much at all so far. I'm looking to find out...


1.) When does the 60-day clock start? Presumably at the point you leave the US? How is that documented (a receipt for some expenditure in the US just before you leave the country?)


2.) When does the 60-day clock stop (and reset)? Say I travel in Canada for 59 days, and then drive back across the border for the day to do some shopping or visit a doctor in the US and return to Canada that evening. Does this reset the 60-day clock? I'm thinking the best documentation here might be a record of the US doctor visit (which would be processed as any other claim in the US under medicare/medigap).


Anyone have some info or experience with this?


Thanks!


Dan

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My initial reaction is that you don't want to try and be too "cute" about something like this. Rules like a 60-day window are there to insure that you are a "traveller," not a part-time resident of another jurisdiction. You may also want to look into supplemental travel insurance policies, although they may have some or all of the same stipulations.

Also remember that these policies are for emergency treatments. More than one "out of the country" claim from the same general area may raise a red flag. Having said that, I would keep documentation of all my entrances and exits (plane tickets, passport stamps, etc.) to back up any claim you may have to make.
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I'm also interested as my only child is a permanent Canadian resident. Although the first answer should be, call your F Plan and ask, we all know that it's not so simple to get a correct answer... one that the plan will stand behind. Ask to get the answer in writing, e.g. a reference to the written page you can access on your computer. Then print it out and put it in a safe place. And beware of subtle changes in policy next year.
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It depends on which country you travel to. It might not even be worthwhile to hold onto Medicare. Many countries provide care free of charge regardless of citizenship, to anyone who is sick, injured, or having a baby. Ask a local person.
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Canada offers visitors heath care coverage. Look into that.
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I am also interested in the answer to this question as I plan to travel out of the
USA when I retire and stay where it is warm for several months in the winter time.
Does anyone else have any experience with this?
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Costa Rica expects you to pay, between 7-10% of your income, for coverage.
Bahamas: Accepts some but not all US insurance. Deposits required.
Puerto Rico: the government is in default. Health care is in crisis mode.
Mexico: no joint agreements with US companies. Must purchase insurance.
Florida: excellent hospitals and a cardiologist readily available. A good Medicare supplement plan readily available. Medicaid for elderly is over loaded with cases so there is a waiting list.
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Thanks Pam!
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Things have wandered a bit from my original question about the 60 day trip limitation with a Plan F medicare supplement. For most foreign travel otherwise, a travel medical insurance plan is the way to go if you're not sure the Plan F coverage applies (or you don't want to use up the lifetime benefit)
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