Will Medicare pay for a visiting nurse ongoing?

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Hi all, my mother really needs more medical supervision - she still lives alone but barely - someone to monitor whether she's taking her medications (she refuses to allow family to do this), someone to check her blood sugar and blood pressure regularly as she doesn't really do so and lies to her doctor about the values. She had a nurse come in regularly after her last hospitalization for about eight weeks and was then "discharged" and has been on her own ever since. I know the day is coming soon when she can't live alone, but in the meantime is there any way to get a visiting nurse back in there on a regular basis that Medicare pays for?

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I would report that SOB Dr's a$$ to anyone who could do something about it! OUTRAGEOUS!!!!

I would change doctors, but I have to realize that in some places, you have to deal with the available doctor even if he's a jerk.
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Thank-you!!!
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Vent away .. it's one of the better uses of our forum. And, you'll find a great deal of commiseration, lol.
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DaredToCare, take satisfaction from the fact that you educated the doctor. This will likely benefit his other patients as well. Now that he knows you were right and he was wrong, he should have more respect for you in the future.
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You know what I hate? The fact that he dismissed me out of hand when I asked for the Dr. Order. I said, please just give me the order, once I have that I will worry about whether Medicare and her supplement will pay. But without the order, I can't even try. He just smirked at me and said, "if you were private pay, then none of this would be a problem for you." Now that I am venting, off topic and probably out of line, I will indulge and mention that when he gave my mum the fentanyl patches he said; " Well, considering the neighborhood you live in, you'd better lock these up somewhere." I never had anyone to talk to about this stuff, so forgive me if I am all over the map for a little while:/
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I just faxed this PDF to my mums Dr. and he is going to write the order for PT that he was refusing to write before. http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/SNFPPS/Downloads/Jimmo-FactSheet.pdf
Did he read the PDF? I doubt it.
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LadeeC you are so right about professional health professionals not bring aware of the change. As recently as last week a Visiting nurse told me that Medicare would not continue home care forever. BEST news is that at least we know about the change and can not only protect our loved ones, but tell others of their right to continuing care. Knowledge is power!
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I think it's a case of good news/bad news: there's the good news that PT (and nursing) can be extended, the bad is so few medPros and agencies are aware of it. Like the two of you, it behooves us all to keep them aware or update them. In their defense, it was Medicare that originally determined the parameters of 'improvement' and made the home care specialists/docs discontinue the care. I'm also grateful for the ones who challenged the case in court. Yay!!

And, uh .. you don't really wanna get me started on the whole western medicine thing. *koffs*
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Thank-You Ladee!
I can't believe how completely unhelpful my mothers Dr. has been on this.
After her last stroke she can't walk anymore, but how did he not see that cutting her off from her PT only made her fall more ultimately costing the system more?ANd after this last stroke her refused to write a recommendation for PT again. Oh this Dr. is a long story for another thread, but I am going to print this case out for him! He can't resent me much more than he already does! LOL.
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I hope this isn't a duplicate post. I lost my connection in the middle of my response. Anyway, worth saying again. Kudos to you LadeeC for bringing the recent case changing Medicare's "no improvement, no more care" rule. I followed up on your comment and found the case online. Anyone interested in more details,just google Jimmo v.Sebelius settlement. God bless the lawyers who negotiated this class action settlement on behalf of all Medicare beneficiaries. And God bless you for posting this info. I'm printing out the settlement summary to hand to any provider who tells me they can't continue to provide service because of "no improvement". As long as a doctor certifies that containing care is necessary for a chronic condition, to maintain a person's status and prevent backsliding, care should be continued.
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