Is this typical in Alzheimer's?

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Her have been on here a few times. My mother in law has late stages of Alzheimers. She has been ok and going to the bathroom if we take her in the right direction but today she is very lethargic and not wanting to do anything or take anything. And she also used the bathroom on herself today. It has been a while since I've had to change Her. Is this typical?

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Unfortunately, people with Alzheimer's go down hill and we don't always know what to expect. She could have a really bad day and then be ok the next. Or she could have a really bad day and that will be her new normal until she slides down once again. Incontinence is always a part of Alzheimer's. If your MIL is still continent count yourself lucky for now. That will change. It may be changing already.

The Alzheimer's will only get worse. You might want to talk to your family about what to do as that happens. If you feel in over your head now you might want to plan for the near future. You're going to need help.
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Thanks for the info. My father in laws mother passed away just last year. She was in her 80s. My mother law is only 65. She is still wearing underwear but today has been a horrid day with her peeing and messed on herself. Between her and my kids I can't sit down. my father law tells me he is sorry he has to leave for work and I get stuck with it. I hate being like that but its true. I don't know how much more I can take. My 2 oldest are in school til 3 but when they get home its just busy busy til he gets home and I can finally go to sleep if my 18 month old allows it. She won't take any food or drink from me. I had to wait for her son to get here to feed her and make her drink an ensure. She won't go to the bathroom for me either so I'm feeling a bit useless today. She has done this once before but seemed to get better and now back to where she was a few weeks ago. We also have to feed her 90% of the time but she won't cooperate for me and I'm guessing because I have been forgotten. That's OK I expected her not to know me even though I have been in this family for 11 years and live next door. IDo what I can to help but I feel like I'm getting over my head.
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Often people with Alzheimer's can stay home. If your family decides to do that, you may want to call in hospice. This makes it so much easier. Your husband may not want outside help, but there are instances where it is needed. Your MIL may reach a point where taking her to the doctor is too difficult. Hospice will come in and take charge of the medical care, so you won't have to go out to the doctor. Also, at the end of her life, hospice will take care of all of the technicalities and their doctor will sign the death certificate. This takes away one of the big problems of dying at home. Hospice is covered by Medicare. I recommend it if someone wants to keep their loved one at home. You may want to see if your MIL qualifies for hospice. She may not yet, since she seems to be just entering late stage.

Another option is selecting a good nursing home (NH) where she will get 24/7 care. The good thing about a NH is you won't have to lift and change your MIL. The bad thing is they aren't covered by Medicare. Your MIL will have to either pay out of pocket or apply for help from Medicaid.

I had an aunt who just died with Alzheimer's. She had a strong family, with three family members living on the property with her. They looked after her in shifts. Toward the end of her life, my aunt's children called in hospice. It made it easier for them and allowed my aunt to die at home -- something she wanted. Hospice was a godsend to them, because getting my aunt from the house would have been very difficult.
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No. No clue where to start. Her husband takes care of Dr visits and future plans. He has expressed he don't want outside help but I think we do! I have 3 kids and the youngest is 18 months. I have to stay with her 2 - 3 times a week with little help and not sure what to do.
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Yes, it is very typical of late-stage Alzheimer's. Have you made plans about what to do from here?
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