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If a client is bleeding, the caregiver doesn't have the right to ask the other caregiver what happened? I've been working full time in the care home for years, and one time, client is bleeding and I ask the other caregiver what happened. Our administrator called me up and said I don't have the right to ask. I am only a caregiver, and I'm not the owner. That I have to put myself in the right place, I am a full time and to ask the reliever for one day work what happened is a no no. I am a lead at work, if another caregiver has a problem with client, I don't report to the administrator anymore. Up to the caregiver to do the report. I am not allowed to ask what happened, so why do the report when I don't know what happened? So, if you're only a caregiver don't have the right to know what happened?

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The first concern I would have goes beyond the right to know, but rather the obligation to chart information that should be available to others in the caring scenario.    I realize that caregivers don't chart as nurses would do, but I did notice that the private duty staff I hired for my father did make observations that could be shared by other staff.  

You might want to CYA by telling your supervisor that the only reason you want to know (what's apparently being kept secret) is to be apprised and aware of any medical conditions that you might encounter and have to address.

I'm not clear on the staffing arrangements, but if someone is bleeding and may require additional treatment for it, to me that information should be made available to those caring for that particular client.
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Is this client your responsibility? You are providing this particular client with care, you're a full-time caregiver, and whatever caused the bleeding happened during a shift when a relief caregiver was looking after the client?

You certainly can't report on a situation if you don't know the facts of the situation. I'm wondering what exactly the administrator was objecting to. Did you confront or challenge the other caregiver in a way that he or she might have found accusatory? Was there an accident or incident which is already being formally investigated, perhaps? It sounds as if it must be a sensitive situation; so in that case perhaps it would be best just to focus on what the client's needs are now, and not how he or she came to be in his/her current condition.
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To me ur post is confusing. In a care facility the "client" is a resident. You are a CNA, LPN or RN.

Even as an employee, you are not entitled to health info on a resident. You are only entitled to the info needed to properly care for them. You r not entitled to knowing how a problem with a fellow employee was handled.
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No, hon. I am sorry. You don't have the right to ask or be answered. Anything that is medical (and you don't say where the patient is bleeding from) is absolutely private. This can only be discussed with the Power of Attorney for Health. You, as a caregiver, unless DIRECTLY INVOLVED in an incident that causes bleeding, have no rights whatsoever to know about it. As I said, a medical issue, and privacy right protected under the law. Sorry. Glad to know that you CARE about your people to this level. Do you suspect that someone harmed a patient? Is that why you asked?
If you have reason to suspect a patient was harmed you should report to your administrator, but the case would not be discussed with you unless you were to appear in court to answer questions.
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Of course the patient has a right to privacy, but when accidents happen in a facility it is good to let everyone know so they can avoid to same thing happening again. Sounds like a case of cover your a** to me.
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worriedinCali Sep 3, 2019
But we don’t know that an accident happened and that a facility is even involved. Use of the word “client” and “caregiver” sounds like home care.
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I would think that patient still has a right to privacy and that the caregiver does not have a right to know HOW things happened, only that something did happen and there’s an injury or condition that needs to be treated.
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Possibly the administrator is thinking that the "cause" is not relevant to you as it may or may not have resulted in another employee getting reprimanded.

What is important is that you know about any wounds and what followup care is needed. Also important,,, is the wound a result in patient decline, more fragile skin, the start of a pressure sore or is the patient engaging in self harm. Those are the things that you need to be made aware of.

Report what happens during your shift and what you observed. What you did.
If you come on duty and the patient has a wound that they did not have previously and it is not tended to report that and tend to it if that is your job. If the wound is there and it has been tended to indicate that and deal with it within your scope.

The how the injury occurred should be in the patient or clients record, if it is within your scope to read patient/client record then you will know what occurred. If you are not able to review the clinic notes then it is beyond your scope of practice.
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