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Sorry to bother you-- Can someone help me please.

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MAKE AN APPOINTMENT with your county's Area Agency on Aging. It's a Federally funded program, but sometimes has different name in different states. They provide free counseling for people in your situation.
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Many employers work insurance does become secondary to Medicare when you turn 65.
It behaves just like having a supplemental insurance. My employer hounded me the day I turned 65 to sign up for Medicare
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Check with your employer. Ask if when you get Medicare does the insurance with them become a supplimental even though you are still working.
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I'd look at the benefits of having both. Some insurance companies waive deductibles and other fees when you have both. Another thing to consider that you didn't mention is if you'll maintain coverage of your work insurance when you retire. Is it part of a retirement package or can you pay to keep it in retirement? As long as you are working, there is no penalty for not signing up for parts B,C,&D. Sign up immediately for part A though as there are no premiums. You've been paying those premiums your whole life via payroll Medicare withholdings. A better answer can be had with a little more info on your situation.
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You can sign up for Medicare A since it is free. It can supplement your current insurance. You may want to see if there are any cost benefits between your private insurance and Medicare. You do not have to sign up for B or D while you are still working. Just ensure that when you leave your job to enroll right away. You will not have to wait for the enrollment period when you have a life change. Just review those plans each year and hold on to those annual booklets.
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