How much salt is ok for 40 percent function heart failure?

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I read conflicting information. And it's hard to keep sodium level really low each day.

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I don't know if you would be eligible or if there are low sodium options available where you live, but getting meals-on-wheels could take some of the burden off having to plan every single meal.
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Handoff I don't know how old you and your husband are but there comes a time when enough is enough and you just make your life miserable.
Staying away from premade foods helps a lot and alternate seasonings. I was on a cardiac diet in the hospital and it was disgusting. no salt or sugar or fat but they did not spare the pepper which I hate. Who can enjoy cream of wheat made with water and fat free milk in the tea.
A talk with a dietician would be a good idea but include plenty of raw fruits and veggies and make your own salad dressings . Don't cook with salt but allow a little on the table or use a substitute. Listen to your husband and find out what his goals are . Yes 40% is getting low but I am strong believer in quality of life.
Baking your own bread is good idea too as you avoid all the preservatives and it still tastes good without the salt fresh from the oven or the bread maker but don't use prepared mixes.
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There is nothing wrong with his mind so make HIM responsible for what he eats. If he decides he would rather eat crackers then it is his choice, he can read labels and weigh the risks as easily as you.
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Salt and sugar is in EVERYTHING pre-made it seems - even where you'd least expect to find sugar, like canned soup - there it is or worse - corn syrup! It's mind boggling what they have to put in to give that processed junk taste. I realize no one really has much time or energy for making bread or crackers from scratch but it is the best way to avoid unwanted ingredients. Also - if you can shop at places like Whole Foods you can find healthy alternatives a little easier.
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Thanks for all the suggestions. Now I need a less time consuming way to count the mgs of salt in a days meals each day. He still eats crackers, cerial, bread, etc. Even though I buy lower salt products there is some salt in everything. I am diabetic type two and don't count carbs each day cause its anoyjng.
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If you eliminate added salt and use other spices for flavoring, like Mrs.Dash, you can help a lot. 1500mg/day is all your body needs. If hubby insists on a salt shaker, use Morton Lite Salt, which has more potassium than sodium and keeps electrolytes balanced.
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None. It's safer and easier to try and cut it all out. You'll still get more than you need.
The easiest thing is to not eat out. Not eat processed food. Eat very simply organic, grass fed beef or chicken and wild fish. Fresh veggies and fruits. Don't cook with salt. Don't add salt. You'll see a big diff in two weeks and food will taste good after you get the junk out. When you eat salt it holds fluid in your body. Then liquids are restricted. Do this with your husband. It's very hard for awhile and then it gets easy and so much easier than checking everything. Just because something says low sodium, don't believe them. I've seen low sodium chicken broth go from 70 to 400 mg of sodium per cup and they all say low sodium. Your tongue will adjust to the no salt taste very soon IF you give it a chance.
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My husbands cardiologist told him to get rid of the salt shaker- to never salt anything - and to never eat anything premade- anything processed. But GA is right on when she says you should be discussing this with your husbands doctor- a specific, individualized plan designed for your husbands needs is what you - and he needs.
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I think as long as you stay away from mass produced pre-made supermarket foods you will be fine... I know, that means you have to cook from scratch and can be a p*i*t*a*.
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Barbara, given your husband's recent medical issues, this is a question you should be asking your medical team. They're the only ones who have the information on any other medical issues as well as the specifics on your husband's cardiac function. I would have thought someone would have discussed or specifically advised you of the maximum acceptable daily sodium intake, but if not, you're entitled to know.

Ask them for an acceptable baseline sodium intake, then research foods to determine what you can prepare, what you can't, and how you can create an acceptable diet.

I believe I've seen some heart healthy recipe magazines in store shelves; that might help on being creative at keeping sodium levels as consistent as possible.

It's a different way of eating; please do consider using herbs as well as they add healthy flavoring, especially if you buy organically grown herbs.

It make take awhile for your husband to become accustomed to this new diet, but it will be worth it in the long run.

My mother kept track of sodium levels of every single thing she ate, after a cardiac event. I did it for my father, keeping a log as to sodium content of every food I fed him. I created a chart of all the foods he likes and listed the sodium levels, so I could quickly pick and choose to put together a low sodium compliant diet.

Most restaurants that we've gone to also have low sodium meals. You might get some ideas from their menus.

I thought that you lived somewhere in the south, Texas maybe? But your profile doesn't include that information. If you're near some good sized medical complexes, contact them and ask if they have any cooking classes and recipes for low-sodium meals.

This is an example of one in our area. Google "Henry Ford Hospital, W. Bloomfield, cooking classes". The second hit is a link to more information and a variety of recipes. There's no single category for low sodium classes, so you might have to do some research.

The Providence Hospital system also has various classes, periodically addressing cardiac issues and low sodium cooking.

Attending one of these classes (often free) would allow you to get out of the house and get some necessary respite from caregiving.

You don't necessarily need to attend the classes, but doing so would give you companionship and contact with others who might be in a similar situation. That can be a good supportive activity.



I'm sure you've been cooking for years and don't need basic training, but these classes can help rethink how to use flavorings and still keep to a low sodium diet.
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