How do you transfer a patient from wheelchair to bed or vice versa?

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If lifting is physically challenging do you prefer boards or manual? I use boards to transfer my grandfather but have to lift him mostly for wheelchair to toilet, or wheelchair to bed, because the board is too hard to get right. Do you guys have the same issue?

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As the skin thins and becomes more fragile bruises and abrasions can become more common.
What I did was to make sure the sling was perfectly aligned and there were no wrinkles in the fabric. (I did this with everything sheets, clothes as well as the slings)
At some point you have to weigh risk VS benefit of getting the person out of bed. You have to ask am I getting them up and into a chair for ME or for THEM.
I wanted to keep things as "normal" as possible for as long as possible but at some point I came to the conclusion that he was safer in bed. I will admit that it was not until the last 1 to 2 weeks that my Husband remained in bed.
It was one of the last realizations that I had that the end was closer. With each piece of equipment that he had to use then "graduated" to a new low that required the use of another piece of equipment.
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I think bruising and skin tears would be a consequence of improper use and not having the right sling, lifts are used exclusively in the NH and there are never problems. If you are going that route have an OT go over your home to identify your needs and fit the sling (they're not one size fits all), and ask about some training to position it properly.
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Thank you very much for all this information. I am looking into hoyer lifts as medicare can cover it. Has anyone had issues with it causing skin tears or abrasions as I read few comments about it.
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Thanks for the OSHA link- a lot of good info there but it doesn't include any balance poles or Friendly Beds. A balance pole can be a critical aid in standing from bed (and can be held onto as long as necessary to prevent a fall). The report shows how devices can save caregiver injuries but ignores the fact that a person in a sling is not using whatever muscle strength they have- which may cause further decline. I would rather see a person using their muscles to the greatest degree possible to safely "help themselves"- better for the person and caregiver. I am not a fan of hoyers unless there are no other choices.
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If you need a hoyer lift and your insurance doesn't cover it, check Craigslist. They seem to have a lot of choice.
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By the way the equipment that I got was through Hospice.
the "guidelines" in a facility require 2 people for using equipment and in general re-positioning but at home that is not a requirement.
There is a safe way that 1 person can use equipment but I would caution if you have any doubts about your own physical strength and ability to handle moving someone with the use of any piece of equipment and that is anything from a gait belt to a hoyer then it would be best that either you have a caregiver at all times when there might be the possibility of having to transfer someone or they be placed where any transfer can be done safely. (That is not to say accidents don't happen in a facility, they can happen anywhere)
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That is tremendously helpful and very interesting reading, thank you!

I particularly enjoyed learning that there should have been two of me repositioning my mother in bed throughout the night ;) But, seriously, it is so good to see practical techniques fully explained.
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Moving this up. Have no experience in this.
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There are many good suggestions here -- I'd like to add a bit. My husband who is much bigger and heavier than I, cannot transfer himself or stand for more than a few seconds. Spoke with his doctor (after a hospital stay) and prescribed physical therapy through Home Health. A Physical Therapist came to the house to work with both of us in our environment as well as evaluating the home situation -- she also made suggestions and recommended products. She gave him exercises to do. A visit from an occupational therapist might be good also. Some equipment is covered by Medicare and must be prescribed by a doctor and patient be evaluated by a therapist to be sure it is the right fit. Good luck -- this is sooooo hard.
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