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Should I be concerned and what should I do?

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It is very important to notify your Mom's physician about her fluid retention. She may need her meds readjusted. Is she urinating normally? Is she up at night multiple times to void? Has she increased her salt intake? Fluid intake? What about her weight? More than a couple of pounds weight gain is a real sign of fluid retention. Is she on any new meds? On a diuretic? Does she have heart or kidney problems? Lots of questions need to be answered. Call your MD.
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Yeah. It may be serious and it may not be. It depends upon whether or not the swelling goes down after elevation of the feet ( preferably at the end of the day). If the swelling goes down, or if the swelling is sporadic ( not everyday), then treat it as seen. If the swelling is chronic (everyday), then intervention may be necessary, i.e. Lasix/ in the a.m., or drinking MORE water. Cut down on the Norvasc if she's taking it. Watch the BP levels, particularly the Systolic.
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yes, my mother had severe edema in legs, ankles and feet. She was able to empty bladder properly and ended up with sepsis. So this is serious. Elevate as much as you can. Lasiks help for swelling. Also, avoid socks and shoes if at all possible. Keep her feet nice and cool. Watch for any blue discoloration in feet or toes due to lack of circulation. If her feet and ankles are constantly swelled, check for blisters on both top and bottom of feet.(they come super fast) My mom developed water blisters from excessive edema which now has burst and turned into sores on her heels.
Again, please contact doctor. There could be underlying condition causing this.
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Call or have her seen by her doctor right away. Sounds like edema, fluid retention. My mother has had this in the past and it led to congestive heart failure. She is now on diuretics and it is under control.
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I agreed with all of you,put her feet up and talk with her doctor. . If nothing else we are a jack of all trades and masters of none,johnnycares
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Elevate her feet as frequently as possible to help the fluid drain. Always test for swelling by a bone - which is an area you would expect to feel firm so if it feels mushier (if it feels like the calf of your leg), it is probably fluid retention. Sometimes you can push with a finger and it will actually dip in that spot a little. She should see her dr. for a diuretic and also to make sure something else isn't going on.
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What chronic conditions, if any, has your mother been diagnosed with?

I'm joining the chorus that says you should consult her doctor. If your clinic or insurance company offer a nurse-helpline, I'd start there.

Good luck!
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It can be from something simple like sitting too long, eating too much salt, etc. When that happens to Mom I wrap her ankles/legs with ace bandages that help push the water out. She also takes Lasix with a potassium supplement. Ask your Mom's doc if she can take it.
If it happens a lot and her legs get really swollen, then it is more of a health issue. Also, one of our medical forum members wrote recently that one leg swelling and the other not is a sign of a more serious problem.
good luck
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when my dad s ankle swells up like that i have to give him water pills . it helps to get the swelling down .
mother needs to see doc about that ...
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Yes, absolutely. This can be a symptom of a more serious problem that only a doctor can diagnose. Get her to her doctor asap to determine why her ankles are swollen.
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