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I was on an account with my father when he passed. It was mine. I paid for the creamation, etc. After that it was mine. depends on the wording. We were joint owners
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There used to be how it was worded "or" or "and". On Moms account it just shows her name first and mine second. If Mom dies, the money is mine.
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The vast majority of joint bank accounts are POD - payable on death - or Rights of Suvivorship. Both of these terms just mean that if one account holder on a joint account dies, the other account holder gets all the money. It doesn't matter what a will says - this is in effect naming a beneficiary and falls outside of a will and probate.

There are joint accounts called Tennents in Common. These accounts are treated as if each of the joint account holders owns half the money. If there is a death, their half goes to the named beneficiary on their half of the account - or is subject to a will and probate. Even if the money is to go to the other account holder - they must be specifically named either in the paperwork that opened the account or in a will. But again, anyone can be named beneficiary. These types of accounts are almost obsolete anymore as they can get messy and complicated when one account holder dies. Seems more often than not, people who opened these Tennents in Common accounts didn't really understand the complications involved.
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If it's a joint account the other person should get it, just as they could go today and get all the money. What is the ownership of the account?
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I would say it depends on how the bank account is set up as well. If it's a POD account the money would go to the other person.
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It depends on how the trust was set up and if there is a will.
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