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She is in a nursing home and they just puree whatever is on the menu! I need some help with ideas to make her g=food more palatable.

I'm assuming that she's had a swallow study done, and is on a dysphagic diet.   When we dealt with this, the speech therapists provided excellent menu lists, distinguishing from "mechanical soft" and "pureed"  diets, both for different levels of swallowing disorders. 

There are published lists, but I've reorganized my medical data collection and can't locate them right now.  They might have been produced by a Dysphagia or Swallowing medical association.   They were the most thorough and best I'd ever seen and were our guidelines.  

This might help you with menus though:

https://www.gicare.com/gi-health-resources/dysphagia-diet/

Is your mother getting speech therapy, which would be typical for someone with dysphagia?   My father got exercises, which did help him improve his swallowing muscles initially.   

I would ask the speech therapist (a) for printed diets guidelines and (b) the speech therapists providing exercises (which she should be getting in a rehab facility).

You can also check other threads here:

https://www.agingcare.com/search?term=dysphagia+diets%2C+specifically
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to GardenArtist
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When you have your meal at night set a portion for mother and after you have finished puree it ready for the next day. Why pay someone else to do what you can do easily - you can always freeze some if your meal isn't always suitable.
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Reply to TaylorUK
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I make drinks for my dad every day. Look at my profile for ingredient suggestions.
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Reply to dads1caregiver
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Thank you all for your info- it does help.
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Reply to cjclark1
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I used to make my own baby food many moons ago. Except for stringy vegetables, any cooked food can be placed in a blender. Just add water or milk to the desired consistancy. With vegetables such as carrots, use some of the water used in the cooking process to retain some of the soluable vitamins
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Reply to MACinCT
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Have you tried her food, that plate of "swill" may not be as awful as you imagine. Mom's NH was actually proud of the fact they offered the same pureed meals as people got on a regular diet and once I got over my aversion to the whole concept I could acknowledge that many of the meals were tasty. Some foods were not done well or just can't be pureed successfully (caesar salad puree was interesting once but not worthy of trying a second time) and I learned to not to select those options, does her facility have more than one meal option? Can you mix and match from the menu?

I'm coming back to add that I think supplementing the food that is available rather than providing completely different meals is more doable. And try to select foods that seem more normal when pureed like custards, puddings and yogurt - mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, squash, rutabaga - refried beans - soups - smoothies - breakfast oatmeal or cream of wheat....
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Reply to cwillie
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I don’t know if this would help you since she is in a facility, but Amazon has some. cookbooks for puréed food.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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