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My parent is in long-term assisted care facility. My sibling has POA and the nursing home is directed by them to only talk with him to make any desicions. My sibling will not speak with me and will not seek additional care for my parent. I want to take my parent to a doctor outside the nursing home to relook at his medicine. Will a doctor take my "Secondary POA" to reassess my parent?

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Saffron, is your parent capable of communicating with a doctor if you took him or her directly? You don't really need any POA to take your parent to a doctor; I've done that for years and no one has ever questioned whether I have legal authority.

I think the issue might be that the facility might not want to release your parent to you, but that also turns on what restrictions there are for temporary outings from the care facility.

An alternate way might be to ask the nursing staff what day the facility doctor(s) make rounds and arrange to be there, or to submit written questions to the nursing staff, or DON, for submission to the doctor.

I think a lot of that depends on your parent's specific situation, and whether or not your sibling has established control over your parent, documentation or not.
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POA really doesn't have anything to do with taking someone to a doctor -- that would be healthcare proxy (Medical POA). Does your sibling have that? If not, you might have some legal grounds to participate in your parent's medical care. Are you willing to turn this into a legal battle?

What does your parent want? Is your parent able to comprehend the concept of seeing a new doctor to evaluate pills? Has your parent been declared incompetent by a court? Maybe it is your parent who can make this decision.
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No, secondary POA's only kick in when the primary POA is incapacitated, resigned, or is dead.
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