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Or give me a one week break a year. Can I take any legal action against her or have my name removed for POA leaving her solely responsible for my fathers well being? He has dementia.

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POA d caregiver have nothing to do with each other. You can have financial POA and that only gives you the authority and responsibility of acting in financial matters. You can have a healthcare POA and that only allows you to make decision regarding treatment or placement.

Now, you can be a caregiver and POA - which it looks like you are saying that you are but that just means that you hold two unrelated positions.

Having your name removed as POA will not relieve you of the burden of caring for your father because it isn't really your "burden" so much as you volunteered for it. Maybe use your POA powers to pay for respite care or a facility.

Maybe when she sees her future inheritance being spent on his care, she will help out more. Who knows. But, it has nothing to do with POA.
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Being a caregiver and being DPOA are separate actions.

Your sibling does not have to provide care. There would be no benefit for filing suit. DPOA is about oversight of their person and assets; DPOA is under no requirements to caregive. Your Dad did co-DPOA and if there is disagreement 1 DPOA will be unhappy. Most DPOA are just done for 1 person.

Your view of what should be done for care is probably very different than your sibling. I'd bet they view your caregiving is totally your choice and that is their right. Perhaps they would have Dad placed into a facility with 24/7 professional staff for caregiving and get him eligible for Medicaid to pay for his stay. If you can, please please try to have a clear calm discussion with your sister on the situation with Dad and agree on a plan for his care.

? out of curiosity, are you living at Dads house and do you work other than caregiving for Dad?
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I agree with what has been said so far. Don't bother your sister again about it; tell your father he's won a vacation at a resort and take him to a care center for the week or two you need to get away. Assure him of the date you're going to come and take him home again. Enjoy your time away! If your sister screams about it, act surprised and tell her you needed to get away for a week or two. Your Dad might actually enjoy his time away, too, which would make it easier to put him in long-term care in the future. Do this every 6 months/year so he begins to look forward to his "vacation."
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Having him go to a care center for respite for you for a week or two is NOT "putting him in a nursing home." Bringing in professional caregivers so you aren't doing this 24/7 alone is NOT abandoning him.

You would like family members to step up and do their share. Of course you would. Who could blame you? But we don't always get what we want, and in that case we need some other ways to meet our goals.

Sister won't help? Use Dad's funds to hire someone.
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Some of us have the unique ability to be a caregiver. Some of us don't. Your sister doesn't. You know how hard it is, not everyone can do what you do. Recognize that and know your dad is better off without sis caregiving. She would if she felt she could. So, find respite for dad two weeks a year, have caregivers come in on a weekly basis so you have even a few hours for you each week to do something for you.

It will eventually be necessary to move dad from his adjacent apartment to a higher level of care where he will have 24/7 care. It may be easier on him now rather than later. An easier transition while he can still figure some things out.
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I slightly hesitate to ask, because it sounds as if you and your sister have just had a discussion and it didn't go so well, but what sort of help have you talked to her about?

I agree with Mom2Mom that a better option would be for you to use your father's resources to pay for professional respite care. Suppose your sister did back down, and did come and look after your dad for a week: seriously, you do not want someone inexperienced AND resentful doing that job.

I can imagine that you feel she's not pulling her weight - I'd think so too, in your shoes - but there might be other, better ways for the two of you to co-operate. And besides: the #1 priority is that you get a break. Eyes on the prize.
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Tip, unless the POA provides that you provide equal care (which I doubt since that's not the purpose of the document), you have absolutely no grounds on which to sue her for breach of duties. I doubt any self respecting attorney would even consider representation for this kind of suit. Sorry.
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If he has funds, use them to hire help for him. If he is barely scraping by, get him on Medicaid waiver with HCBS (home and community based services). No one expects you to give up your life.
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Tlparker, does your sister feel that Dad needs a higher level of care, and you prefer to keep him in his home? Sometimes it takes tough love to get someone to see the forest for the trees.

Anyone can be a person's caregiver, they do not need to have Power of Attorney. The POA does makes it easier if you need to make medical decisions for your father if he is in the hospital, etc.

As for removing your name, only your father can do that, and I doubt he is able to do that at this point in time.

To take legal action can be very costly if you can even find an attorney would even bother with such a minor situation [I know, it's not minor to you]. Use that money to put Dad into Respite care so you can catch your breath. You might find that Dad likes being in Assisted Living/Memory Care.

Or hire professional Caregivers from an Agency to fill in while you take a break.
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So let me get this straight. You and your sister have shared POAs for your father with dementia and she is not giving you a break because you are doing all the work. Right? You can sue anyone for anything, but all you will do is be spending your money (unless you have tons). So, you either hire someone to care for your father for a week while you have respite (take a trip by yourself), or tell your sister to step up to the plate. I guess she doesn't want to which is a sad thing considering your father cannot speak for himself. He is basically helpless and any daughter who would not help out in these circumstances - well, there will be a special place for her in hades...only my thoughts.
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