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My mom sits in a recliner that raises up to standing. What would be the best tool to move her from the chair to the wheelchair?

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Some really good comments here and geedeeooo is right- sometimes money has to be spent when someone's back/health is at stake. When the need is there sometimes funding sources will help out. I know the original question was recliner to chair but bed transfers/repositionings are usually worse- just had a case of 320# man (Parkinsons) with 110# wife- they needed an immediate solution before someone was hurt.
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There are three people in this home assuming stepfather if fit who can barely look after themselves. What are your long term plans? Transferring mom from recliner to WC sounds as though it is the least of your problems. I realize you love you mom and want to take care of her but maybe the time has come to make other arrangements and have step dad live up to his responsibilities. Does you mom love you enough to stop asking you to do this. After all you are not getting paid and living in their house is not enough compensation. mom needs more care than you are able to provide going forward not to mention the stress so discuss it with your husband and work out the best way for the two of you to survive. Best of luck
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I am not sure if your mother has the ability to stand or not. Assuming she can stand when the lift recliner puts her on her feet, she should first stand with a walker. If she can take a step in the walker either forward or to the side, you can slip a wheelchair or transport chair under her and move her to bed.

There are wheelchairs with arms that drop if standing is a problem, and various
transfer benches which can allow a person to move along a bench from chair to wheelchair. However, it the person is weak or lacks stamina, they tend not to be able to do this several times a day.

There are manual and battery driven lifts which can be used to move a person who can no longer walk or stand.

With the correct techniques and equipment one person can safely transfer another individual. I was able to transfer my father with lifts after he could no longer stand or walk. He was almost 6'2'' so it can be done.

I would get pointers from a PT and exercise the patient to keep their muscle tone as good as possible. Never attempt a move when the person is exhausted
because it will not work. The patient has to be able to follow the lead and not
obstruct it. My father's mental ability was always good which did assist in his care. I found stating clearly how you were going to do the move helped both of us.

Good luck.
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We got an battery powered EZ Lift (I think generic name is "sit to stand" lift). They were listed at $1,500 to $2,000 or more but we found one on ebay for $500 and $150 shipping. But I think of it like this-SF is next of kin to your mom. He has the authority for decisions therefore the responsibility for her. If he is able to buy the lift he should. I don't think any single person should have to lift another person. There are life and death situations where it must be done but to do it constantly isn't right for the safety of the caregiver or the loved one. SF shouldn't put off on others what he can't do on his own. To overcome the objection of spending the money I have two points. One, the amount of times the lift is used divided into the amount of money spent on it makes each lift a really cheap way to save your body from disaster. We use the lift for my mom at least ten times a day. That is just to lift my mom, not counting setting her back down which is also a strain to do manually. The cost of losing your own health is way less than the cost of a lift. Two, when your mom no longer needs the lift your SF may need it for his own care. If not, you still have something that you can sell for close to what you paid for it. These machines are made for heavy, constant use in nursing homes. They are extremely sturdy and durable. I commend you for doing everything that you are doing, I recommend getting any and all help that you can to make this almost impossible task bearable.
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@Frenchmaidline - I was able to find a great lift on craigslist. It was only $20. I'm sure you can find one a lot less expensive than $1500.
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And I really do insist having him try with help. Not alone, that could be dangerous for the both of them... let me know how it goes!
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To be honest, I'm a small girl lol. Not that strong either. It's all in your posture and movement. I'm 5`7 and 135 lbs. And I've lifted some pretty heavy people. I would say give it a try, but with supervision. You would be surprised how just a swift movement with correct position is really easy! Maybe have the therapist show him...I too have back problems, but never really had an issue unless my patient pulled away. Try it once, again under supervision. Thanks for your comment! I just read the weight, I have done that. But like I said, positioning is key here. Is gotta be one swift move. Up, turn, lower, your therapist should be able to demonstrate and guide! Best of luck!
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Frenchmadeline, I wouldn't expect you to make a transfer from a chair or bed without help. Your and your husbands surgeries would make it very ill- advised to do this type of lifting. As for your step-father, he is probably right in assuming he would need to make plans for his own care since you aren't blood relatives and are already stressed out caring for your mother. He is probably being practical, not really selfish. Don't be so hard on him.
The way I see it, you need help. Contact your Area Agency on Aging to find out what is available in your area. A once a week housekeeper, physical therapy for your mother, you and your husband, and other possible help is what you need. Perhaps, you could get someone to come in for a couple of hours a day just to bath, transfer, etc. for your mother. Medicare will pay for some types of help and a caseworker will know what is available. Volunteers might be available too from a church or civic organization. Contact your pastor. You need help. Also, it sounds like you may be clinically depressed with your thoughts about death, anxiety attacks, etc. Talk to your doctor to see if you are able to get medication to help. I didn't think I was depressed, but my doctor insisted I try Celexa and I found I was so much more able to handle things and get the sleep I had been missing due to rehashing the day's occurrences every night.
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@privatecare123, the method you use is used by my friend, who is a super good and caring home health physical therapist, when he puts my Mother to bed for me. But he is 6'3" and 225 lbs. and my Mother's weight (about 175 lbs.; she has gained 40 lbs. since being diagnosed with dementia a few years ago) doesn't appear to bother him. From your picture it is quite difficult to know if you may be a taller woman with big bone structure who might be able to lift a patient who weighs the same or more than you. My immediate problem I guess is I don't know what I should expect from my stepfather who is here at my home every day when Mother is put to bed. He's 5, 11" and pretty sleight since he was losing weight as my Mother has gained hers. He says he can't do what you've described (as yourself being able to do) and what my friend does to lift my Mother. Do you think I should insist that he try? (All of this over the last several years is undeniably destroying our (my husband's and mine) physical and mental health and our relationship and any dreams we had for the future. My brother is wonderful, he calls every day though he won't talk problems in depth, (he agrees he's my Mother's favorite) is in Ohio and visits us in Florida twice a year. He likes Florida; my husband and I hate it here. We thought we could get my mother and stepdad settled here and then return to California. It's totally crazy but we sold our ocean view dream home tin L.A. to temporarily relocate to Florida since that was what my Mother wanted so much and could not pull off on their own. That was in 1999 and they've hated it since they got here but without telling us of course! The Mayo Clinic made a horrible mistake with my husband's care that led directly to a hip replacement for which we had no insurance and then a knee replacement and the other hip replacement. We have used up our entire retirement funds because this started when he was in his early 60s, and he's 71 now (though even with medical problems a "young" 71 if you know what I mean, with dreams of returning to the international business world) and will need ankle surgery some day or won't be able to walk. We think we
re going insane most days but still try very hard to do our best for my Mother. Only occasionally do I feel used by her, with the knowledge since she finally told me that all she ever wanted was her husband to take early retirement and be home with her, in N.J. but never all of us move to Florida. Sorry I went into the whole background but it is sort of important). My stepfather has my husband help him. But it is very hard on my husband's back, with which he has continuous trouble, spasms and pain. I help sometimes to relieve my husband of the responsibility but I've got three bad lumbar discs, I've had a spinal fusion in C4, 5 and 6; take prednisone for poly myalgia rheumatica, and I'm always in pain and always called upon to do something: make her breakfast, cook everyone's dinner, do the laundry, change the bedding, change my Mother, We can't really afford a $1500 lift as I have seen some of them costing though I'm pretty certain my stepfather can. He's 10 years younger than my Mother and worries about his money running out before he needs it for his care. This is such a mess and so different than my life was 15 years ago that I have anxiety attacks and think constantly of death, mine and everybody else's. So I guess what I'd like is your opinion based on your last comment, i.e., not to do it if you are not physically able. I think quite possible my stepfather is physically able, but he just won't try it. Yet he doesn't seem to mind gambling on our health. Thank you if God bless you, you read this in its entirety! I'm sorry it's so long but it felt good to get some of that off my chest. This is the only website I have time for. Rather that I take the time for. I always learn something and I always commiserate with someone. But what I find the most amazing and the most valuable are the comments and hints that are given by the professional caregivers. It is one of the most heartwarming parts about this site, and I for one applaud you and everyone like you. Where in life would we all be if people like you did not exist. Thank you from the bottom of my heart, Ms. privatecare123 and always stay well! madeline
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How much does she weigh? When I worked in a home I would move the recliner up as far as it would go. Put the wheelchair directly to my right, and have the patient hug me (never did) put my arms under theirs, clasp my hands and lift and rotate to the chair. If that's possible it's pretty easy, if not a lift is your best bet. But in order to do that technique, the wheel chair has to be as close to the chair as possible. So no one gets hurt. If your not physically able, don't do it!
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p.s. Put the other end on the seat of the wheelchair - of course!
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You can also get a transfer board. Lift up one arm on the wheelchair. Slide one end of the board under the person and put the other end on the seat. Then just slide the person from the chair to the wheelchair.
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there are some great web sites that have videos that demonstrate different ways to move someone safely for both the patient and the caregiver. Whatever you have Mom hold onto make sure it locks in place and can handle her weight.
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Countrymouse is right. A PT or OT can be sent out to your house and Medicare should pay for it. Her doctor will have to order it, she will be evaluated and then they will start therapy which will include your training and suggestions for her safety. If she is essentially housebound, they can come to you. Her doctor or the Area Agency on Aging can recommend an agency in your area.
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I have a process I've used successfully for many years.But if she requires being physically lifted and placed into the chair, then by all means do what ferris1 says and have someone demonstrate the correct process in person. You do not say if she is able to support any of her weight herself. There is the coolest pivot tool that sits on the floor. You use body mechanics to reduce the impact to about 45 pounds, no matter how large the patient is.
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I'm not sure where one can buy this belt, but it wraps around the waist and you lift from there. Don't try this if you have back problems or the patient is heavy. Have a physical therapist show you correct body mechanics so you don't get hurt. Good luck!
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I'd get an OT or a PT to demonstrate, and then to watch you doing it yourself and make sure both that she is safe and that your back is safe! If you need mechanical aids, they will advise on that too.
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If you don't want to spend a lot of money you could try this sling healthproductsforyou/p-18370-mts-safetysure-transfer-sling.html?gclid=CI7zqZ2WlLwCFepQOgodt1MALw

The website also has other products that'd may help you find what you're looking for. You can also call your local medical supply store and they can help you...

If expense is a problem and she is semi sturdy on her feet you can have the chair stand her up then slide the wheelchair in behind her. If she is not sturdy on her feet, bring the wheelchair as close as possible and use the chair to get her in the upright position and have her put her weight on you and ease her into the chair. If that is too much, you can try a pool noodle if you can get a big one, (2 if you can only find the thin ones) inside a folded long ways bed sheet Using Rubber bands to close off where the noodle and sheet meet and slide behind her for some support as you transfer her from chair to wheelchair.

My grandma was about 80 lbs by the time she really needed us to help her get up so often I would just have her lean forward and put all her weight on me or her walker.

Good Luck.
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