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Bile, salt diarrhea. Thank you.

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Becky, you prompted me to go and look these things up properly.

There are several different types of appliance, all with various drawbacks, and all only really recommended for use when it is essential to keep a bed-bound patient's skin uncontaminated (so that absorbent pads are no use, for example).

This is the list I found:

External anal pouch This consists of a bendable wafer which has an opening at its centre. One side of the wafer adheres to the skin around the anus and the other side is connected to a collection bag. The bag has a re-sealable port at the bottom end through which faeces can be emptied without the need to remove the wafer from the skin. This port can also be connected to a larger gravity drainage bag. Some bags also have a flap to allow flatus to escape and prevent the bag filling with gas.

Intra anal stool bag This is made of latex (20cm non extended, 26cm extended) that is inserted into the anus and an adhesive attachment (10cm in diameter) applied round the anus to secure it in position.

Rectal tubes and catheters These are inserted into the rectum to channel loose stool into a collection bag. A balloon near the tip of the catheter (inside the body) can be inflated once the catheter is in position to prevent leakage of stool around the catheter and to prevent the tube from coming out during a bowel movement 

Rectal trumpets The trumpet is made up of a naso-pharyngeal airway connected to a drainage bag. The flange (wide) end of the trumpet is inserted into the rectum. A trumpet is shorter than a rectal tube so there is less chance of damaging the lining of the rectum. The other narrow end of the trumpet can be connected to a drainage bag.


If our OP's loved one's stool is extremely caustic, as sounds possible, it might be still worthwhile to ask. I agree with you that this is definitely not a decision for enthusiastic amateurs to make, though!
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A rectal tube according tomRN’s I know is very painful throughout the the entire process. Most would not permit it to be used for their loved one unless the absolute only option. They be dangerous to the patient.
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Yes; I mentioned this a lot in my post. Please read it again. It’s used for comatose ICU patients on liquid or IV diets most commonly. Turning the patient starts from the toes up; all tubes, wires; equipment, IV’s, drainage bags, kitchen sinks...need to be untethered and adjusted along with the turn of the patient. Not a task for most amateurs.
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Sorry to say that in my experience the more readily available incontinence pull ups and briefs didn't do a very good job with fecal incontinence, very watery diarrhea just isn't easily absorbed and tended to overflow instead.
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Yes there are lots :)

If you Google "continence care" you will get results for companies that specialise in products that suit a great variety of needs. Browse two or three websites until you find brands to try, then order a couple and take it from there.

I've just read Gemswinner's reply, which sounds interesting (if alarming!). If the problem you're dealing with is long-term it could be worth asking your doctor about.
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Yes, there exists an item called a rectal tube. It’s really only useful for patients with only liquid diarrhea, and patients who are not combative.
It’s inflated inside the rectum so pulls can cause severe damage: caregivers all need to be reminded with a note always at the head of the bed. The tube attaches to a bag that can be emptied: it’s for bed-bound patients.
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