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This is an adult community, they are using this excuse to stay in our community. Are there credentials needed to be a caregiver in Florida?

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I think the key here is 'not a disruption'. One can 'get away' with retirement/over 50 communities but one cannot get away with 'childfree', which many people would actually pay through the nose to live in. That discussion aside, I think the emphasis should be on whether or not the 'questionable' resident is bothering anyone else.
The example of the partying boozing drugging little bugger was something that should never have even been given any sort of haven by the actual resident.
18 on up can be caregivers, but the line has to be drawn somewhere. This is why I say does not disrupt or disturb. This eliminates young children altogether in my opinion.
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Hi there, I sold real estate in Florida for years and would list and sell in these communities. Most age-restricted communities have two restrictions. The first says that each household (or 80 percent of the households) must include a resident over the age of 55. The second adds an age restriction for the remaining members of the household, such as being over the age of 40 or simply over the age of 18. They can even set guidelines for how long underage visitors (such as grandchildren) are allowed to stay with community residents. I only encountered a "live-in" caregiver one time, who was a 35 year old niece and it was never questioned. She was there in a "caregiver" capacity, quiet, they kept to themselves, paid their association dues on time, etc. If these people are truly helping out, and they aren't a disruption, I wouldn't see a problem.
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JHall refer this problem to the Homeowner's Association. The Trustees will act on compliance via due process.
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Sounds legit to me too. You don't really want your neighbors unable to receive care from families, do you? Live-in care is probably keeping lot of them in the community instead of assisted living or even skilled nursing.
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It is probably like those "therapy dogs." Federal does not allow you to ask what a person's disability is and the dogs don't need to be trained at all.
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Carla, good point about the serenity of adult communities. As I type this I'm reminded of those folks, such as a neighbor, who like to putter around outside with radios blasting so loudly I can hear the racket in any room.
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I agree with Txcamper. I would report them to management or the board if they are doing something wrong and ignore otherwise.

I lived in a 62+ community with my ex when I was 52-57. He was 12 years older, so we qualified. There were a few others with one older and one younger that all worked out fine. However, there was one woman whose son moved in. He was nothing but trouble -- drugs, late nights, reckless driving. He was asked to leave pretty quickly.
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GardenArtist - You're right, the HOA makes the rules and they can change them at any time, and choose to enforce them or not as they deem appropriate.

I personally like having a mix of ages (and races, and nationalities) in a community, but there's something to be said for the "older adult" enclaves. The one my mother lives in is very quiet, clean, and safe, and the homes and yards are all well-kept. That's why people live there. Kids and grandkids visit the residents all the time - on weekends the pools are taken over by rowdy kids, even though they're supposed to be supervised and accompanied by a resident. Holiday parties and special events in the community are family-friendly also. The people that live there seem to really like it. I like it too, but one of the reasons I don't live there full-time is that I like having more kids and younger folks around, and I'm willing to put up with the noise and commotion and occasional candy wrappers on my lawn.

I agree with your main point though - there's no need to police other people unless they're interfering with your quiet enjoyment of your own property. Busybodies are not anybody's favorite neighbors.
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Why are you concerned?
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I think whether or not proof would be necessary would depend on the HOA by-laws and any deed restrictions that were recorded when the complex was developed.

Personally, I've always thought a range of ages was appropriate for any community - older folks get to see little babies and it cheers them up (generally), children see people growing old and hopefully learn not to be frightened of them. Families walk their dogs and get acquainted with other neighbors.

Other adults are available to help out - that's really important in a community - it creates bonding and I think stability.

I've seen that vanish in my community as municipal problems have developed, people have fled, companies purchase abandoned and/or foreclosed homes as rentals, and the mix of owners vs. renters changes, and renter turnover rises.

People who are compassionate and/or willing enough to help their neighbors don't create dissension by calling and reporting every time a blade of grass grows higher than 6".
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You should be happy for your neighbors they have caring family members who want to live with them, Are you a little jealous? Mind your business unless they are causing disturbances or problems. Get something more to occupy your time and enjoy your life.
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My mother lives in a 55+ community. She said her neighbors, a married couple, have their two 30+ yr. old sons living in their condo. She doesn't know the rules or details about this, I guess they could say that they're caregivers. The sons are making money by doing handyman work and odd jobs for the other residents, including my mother. (They do the jobs that aren't covered by the HOA)
(we're not in Florida. I'd think it would be up to the individual communities.)
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My mother lives in a 55+ community also, in a house that she and I co-own. My two older sisters also live there. In our community, there's an age exception for caregivers (whether relatives or not) and the community has some sort of criteria for assessing that. When it's an adult child, though, there's less scrutiny. We have quite a few people under 55 living with their parents; most are caregivers (or at least chauffeurs for parents who no longer drive) and some are not. A few sons or daughters under age 55 have hit hard times and needed to move in with their folks; in one case, an under-55 daughter stayed on after her elderly parent entered a nursing home. Everyone sort of looks the other way as long as the person obeys the community rules. I don't think we have any residents younger than 40 or 45, and they all seem to fit right in without any problems.
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If they are causing disruption, or disturbing the peace, report them to the board. Usually there are guidelines in place to address this situation.
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I doubt too many grown children who are under 55 would want to voluntarily live in a retirement community. They are there to help their parent(s).

Plus if the Board of Directors of the community ban anyone under 55, it would become very difficult to hire a professional caregiver for ones self who is 55 or older.
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