My Dad has severe arthritis Would a compression cushion help?

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He sits in his chair for most of the day. My father weighs very little which means his bones on his backside tend to hurt.

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I'm so glad that your aren't underplaying his arthritis. Severe arthritis can be excruciating and sometimes people just get so used to pain that they don't say much. Knee supports and other types of over-the-counter interventions can be very helpful.

Keeping pressure off of joints is important so a compression pillow sounds like a good idea. The kind with a hole helps keep pressure off of the tailbone and can help avoid some back pain.

You sound like a terrific caregiver. Keep sharing your tips and questions.
Carol
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The less a person moves the more painful it will become. Not moving around will only make his condition worst. Try a exercise or range of motion plan, it can be as simple as every 30 min to hour have him stand up and walk in place or stand up and sit down 10 to 20 times; very simple and spread out exercises throughout the day will help. I also came across a product called Noni lotion and it works a little goes along way. the website is REAL-NONI
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Apple cider vinegar is the Rx of choice. I have arthritis & heard about this "grandma remedy" just when I was diagnosed. I've been taking 2 tbsp. daily in water, once in a.m. & once before sleep... Voila, I am literally pain-free. The ACV apparently "washes out" deposits in one's joints. No side FX, it's nature's answer... & which Big Pharma doesn't want us to know about. It may not help advanced cases of arthritis as much, but definitely worth a try.
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There is a cushion called a roho. It is the best out there as far as I know. Insurance typically won't pay for it unless he has a very deep pressure sore. If you are willing to pay up front and can find it, that is what I would suggest.
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Assuming what you mean by a compression cushion is one with a hole cut out of it, my dad (and I) have been using one for years. There are several different shapes and materials. For his wheelchair he has a cushion that is the same thickness front and back. For his recliner he has a cushion that is tapered in the front and higher in the back. I use this type of cushion in my car and on all my chairs as it helps with my posture. They seem to range in price from $10 to $35. You can get them at an orthopedic store (more expensive) or Best Buy, Target, among others. It is important to get one with a cover you can remove for cleaning. They come with different surfaces: smooth, smooth and somewhat slippery, and a suede-like cover that can keep you from sliding. In the car I use a smooth one. On the chair I use the most I use the suede-like one. My dad has arthritis and spinal stenosis, and the cushions have been a great help to him.
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Dad should qualify for some home-health therapy. They can send an OT over to his home, fit him for one specific to his needs. Call his primary and ask them to make a therapy order for this specifically.
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What homecare1 said! Would your dad enjoy a daily stroll around the neighborhood or in the park in nice weather? Perhaps a membership in a fitness center that has a program for elderly/disabled?

You might consider getting a mini-trampoline, also known as a rebounder, with a safety rail for him to hang on to. One of these won't take up much space and offers low-impact exercise that he can do while watching television or listening to music. Getting Dad on his feet more may not cure arthritis, but it can help lessen the pain, improve mobility and prevent further deterioration.

This site has some info: trampolining-online./rebound-therapy/
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I have not heard of a compression cushion helping. Sometimes bracing helps but I would suggest gentle heat and gentle range of motion exercises. If they are done carefully, a little movement can go a long way in offering some pain relief. If she can get access and can comfortably get into a warm water therapeutic pool to do some gentle movements.... this might help as well.
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If feasible, you might consider some acupuncture treatments. Arthritis usually (but not always) responds well to acupuncture.
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Ascidophilus brings out fluid in joints try health food store in refrigerated section one that has 5 billion cells advil liquid green capsule with use of Tylenol will decrease pain
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