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My dad is in a memory care facility but he is one of two higher-functioning residents. My dad and his buddy are fully ambulatory, able to carry on a conversation, etc. The other residents are out-of-it most of the time, slumped over in wheel chairs. My dad's buddy got moved to the adjacent building, which is a regular ALF but fully secured (locked). It is more cheerful and there are more suitable activities for a functional person. I am meeting with the facility director next week to see about moving my dad next door with his buddy and into a more active atmosphere.

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It sounds like your dad (and his buddy) were improperly placed in a memory care unit (for demented patients around stage 5 and beyond) when he may be at a level 4. How depressing it would be to have to be around "zoned out" later stage patients.
Maybe the Assisted Living side was full and they both got placed in the MC section until there was room.
If your dad qualifies for the other side, they should be able to move him too.
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Thank you for the responses! It seems that a lot of the staff floats between the two buildings and knows all of the residents as a whole. Both buildings are small and have a similar layout, so I am hoping my dad will transition easily. I was surprised that the regular ALF is locked also. It's definitely a more lively and positive place.
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That's interesting.. I haven't heard of an Assisted living that's locked and secured either.

My parents are in the same dilemma and that is the main reason I picked the memory care that I did because there were several other residents at their level. You might look around for a different memory care to see if you can find one with some higher functioning residents.

I would ask lots of questions of the ALF to make sure they can handle any dementia behaviors that he may have. My parents are higher functioning level but they need lots of help to.. I could imagine them getting lost at an Assisted Living.. and quickly needing more help then they could provide.
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Well, it's something to explore. I know that I thought that my LO was better equipped to be in a regular AL in the beginning and so did they. She seemed to function okay, but, then she started wanting to stay in bed, resisted baths, refused to go to dining room, (she's forget where she was going on the way to the dining room), she was confused a lot because she couldn't keep up with the conversations of the other residents, couldn't remember anyone's name, was too confused to follow games, movies or even live entertainment. Then she started wandering. So, she obviously needed more care. In MC, her first roommate was quite high functioning and she looked after my LO. However, she passed away as has 3 other of my LO's roommates! So, no matter how a resident may appear one day, they can progress quite fast.  Oh, in our state, the MC has to have daily activities for the residents.  They try to make it something that each person can participate in. 

I hope you can find a place that's just right for your dad. It'll give you so much peace of mind.
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When we moved him, yes, he seemed to need a MC facility. He was very confused and paranoid. He's been diagnosed with dementia by multiple doctors. But, they are not really doing any activities at his MC that are consistent with his functional ability. He is in between....can't function in the world safely but not at the stage of the other residents. The other residents are "comatose" as my mom puts it. Someday he will be there, but for now he is starting to just stay in bed and not come out because there is no longer any residents on his level. I think since the other ALF is locked he should be OK there.
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I suppose it depends on the state and their particular guidelines.

I've never heard of an AL that is secure, if it's not MC. Hmm......

I would certainly discuss your dad's situation to see what is the best fit for him. I know that a regular AL soon was not adequate for my LO. We needed a doctor's signature stating why she needed Memory Care or Special Care Unit as they call it. It was my understanding that a regular AL can only handle residents who have limited incontinence, 1 person transfer assist, do not wander, and can get along with only reminders, oh, and those who do not resist assistance. After a certain point, it seemed to me that the care needed was too much for the staff.

If you father is able, then, I'd explore placing him near his buddy. As long as he is able to function there. Oh, I would imagine that the MC is ore expensive than regular AL, so, I'd keep that in mind. It shouldn't make a difference, but, you know....Did they do a needs assessment to determine if he really needed MC?
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