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Hello. I heard about a vibrating insole made for the elderly with Diabetes. This insole is expected to improve the sensing ability of the feet and it is said that this vibrating insole can even prevent a potential fall. will this product work ?

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I just looked vibrating shoe inserts up. Wow! I would definitely have tried these for my husband. And I'll keep them in mind for myself, if I start having balance problems.
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The place you are most likely to find shoes deep enough to accommodate an insert is a podiatrist's office, a place that carries orthopedic shoes, or an Orthotics & Prosthetics clinic. These generally are custom ordered. I shopped once in a "running shoe" store, bringing my insert with me, and they found exactly ONE style that was deep enough. But one was all I needed, right?

You are right. Get the insert first, and then get a shoe that will work with it. And if you find that the vibrating insert isn't for you, go back to where you got the shoes (or a podiatrist) and have them make a custom insert for you. The deep shoes won't be wasted!

Many insurance policies and Medicare cover special footwear for people with diabetes, if you doctor fills out a form. Places that carry "diabetic shoes" have the forms and many will contact your doctor. It covers one pair per year and generally you get a few inserts, so you can put in a fresh one as they wear out.

As you know, taking care of your feet is extremely important when you have diabetes.
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My thinking is that putting something inside your shoes means you will need a pair that accommodates the added insoles. I am a runner and I normally wear these insoles that add a small amount of arch, plus some cushioning to the heel. I cannot imagine adding more bulk inside any shoe without causing discomfort. However, I can't imagine using vibration while NOT walking can be harmful, so long as it's gentle to the skin, that is, so long as it doesn't rip it up! Try putting your feet on a vibrating pillow and see! I know that I am right now dealing with some numbness in my fingers and toes but I am not diabetic. I believe this is a temporary condition not related to any permanent damage, that is, it's a different problem entirely. This is why I am certainly open to trying anything that might help related or similar problems. A friend of mine suggested Vitamin B-12, which I was already trying for a different problem but I found it wasn't doing the trick.

I know this might sound silly, but one thing I thought of that's undoubtedly totally far-fetched is the Reverse Hot Flash Prevention. That is, try doing whatever they tell us you should NOT do to prevent a hot flash. These little tricks might open up peripheral capillaries and at least warm up fingers and toes, inducing a hot flash, that is, getting them to come back! Frankly, I'm FREEZING and wouldn't mind getting one or two hot flashes back right now, saving on my heating bill, too. Cayenne pepper, here we come.......And yes, I did get one yesterday, it was embarrassing, too. Tacos, anyone?
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No, not yet. I've had a back problem and went for my first therapy/acupuncture session on Wednesday, then stood around at the UPS place for half an hour, then went to the post office and stood there for 45 minutes, then came home to the ISP guy (who was great, but none of my passwords worked, then we got it sorted) ... and then I was all bent over and had to cancel my therapy session for today and another doctor's appt next week. I am *not* doing well. When will I ever be able to stand for oh, one minute, again? Never mind walk. I am not happy!!
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Hi Jinglebts, I'm interested in hearing an update. Did you get the insoles? What are your thoughts today?
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You betcha, cwillie. I'm going to have to buy the soles and *then* the shoes to go on the outside, and still have my feet inside. They'll all three have to fit. ;=)
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I wouldn't get vibrating shoes. If you want to try something because you're willing to try anything, try a vibrating platform machine.
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I did read up on them after my comments Jingle, the studies do sound positive and they are inexpensive so I guess there is no harm in trying. I personally can't see how they can be anything but excruciatingly uncomfortable though, I find it is hard enough to find comfortable, good fitting shoes without cramming in an insole full of vibrating tech.
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I advise anyone who has balance problems to do a search on these things. I did, and I'm going to get a pair.
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I would think it would make them unstable on their feet.
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I have found that the thing for numbness in my feet is hyaluronic acid--I take it in capsules and use a face cream with it on my feet every morning. Have noticed a distinct difference--have gone from the numbing on the soles to almost normal sensation.
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The loss of sensation in the feet in elderly people with diabetes is not likely to be reversed or improved by a bit of massage. And since the skin tends to be very fragile, too, I'd have thought this product sounds a bit dodgy. But by all means ask your Diabetic Nurse or other specialist practitioner about it.

By the way. When you say "this product is said to" etc., who says? If it's the manufacturer or an affiliate of the manufacturer, such as a magazine carrying their advertising, there's a clue.
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Think about it. If something is vibrating on your feet, moving, the potential for falling is greatly increased. You can buy the shoes with little nubs on the inside sole which would massage the feet, but they do not move and I believe they are removable. Best solution with people who have diabetes is keep their weight down, take their insulin (if needed) and exercise as much as possible given their limitations. Diabetes is a diet-generated illness unless it is inherited. Too much weight is unhealthy for any person.
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Don't know anything about it and it may bring comfort and distraction. however neuropathy in the feet is caused by actual nerve damage so may be helpful as a comfort measure but could not be curative. Worth a try anyway.
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The University of DE Parkinson's research unit at STAR campus conducted trials for the vibrating shoe soles. My husband participated in this project in 2015. Ingrid Aboff-Pretzer is the head of the research projects. My husband found his balance improved and he felt more secure when walking. Hubby has drop foot and neuropathy of right leg and foot.
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Try! By the way, I discovered that a vibrating pillow helped my dog with her fear of thunder. You could probably make your own vibrating device cheaply, just to try out. Here's how: Put an electric toothbrush into a pillow, and turn it on! Or...well, any vibrating device will do. I have seen vibrating chairs in malls. I think you pay per seating. Try that and see if you get results before spending money on something. I've also seen an inexpensive pillow/vibrator/heater that you put your feet into on a winter day. Made in China. One day I turned on the heat and put it in my lap, then had my dog sit on the pillow. But accidentally I turned on the vibration and that's how I discovered the amazing way it calmed down my dog during a thunderstorm. I shared this with my vet, too.
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I've never heard of it. In my opinion if it had any merit it would be more widely available.
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