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My dad has neuropathy in both feet from diabetes. He recently is complaining of pain in both hands that keep him awake at night and bother him through the day, he says when he squeezes his hands it goes away. We ask his primary doctor about it yesterday and he said it's probably arthritis and then I convinced him to look his hands over and he squeeze the finger saying yes theres circulation and just blew it off. Dad says it kind of burns also, this kind of sounds to me like getting neuropathy in his hands, any suggestions ?
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Literally, neuropathy translates as "disease of the nerves." In the context of chronic diabetes, it's usually a reference to 'peripheral neuropathy', a complication of diabetes, which means that the nerves in the extremities and then gradually the limbs become progressively damaged by excess of sugar in the bloodstream.

The important distinction is between the peripheral nervous system and the central nervous system, though. The central nervous system is what keeps you upright and keeps your heart and major organs going. The peripheral nervous system deals with things like sensation of hot and cold and pain - still very important, but not literally vital.

The most serious common risk is infection, which is why diabetics are urged to take excellent care of their feet. Because sensation is reduced, ulcers, blisters, cuts and so on can develop into really nasty, infected wounds before the person realises what's happening; plus healing takes much longer in a limb whose blood supply is compromised.

Later on, if the diabetes is not well controlled, even more serious effects can occur which could include blindness and limb amputations.

These are not scare stories, they are real. But if you are caring for someone with diabetes, the crucial thing is to encourage them to work hard at managing the condition, and remind them that the worst, terrible complications can be avoided through good, consistent control of blood sugar levels.

And GA is quite right - there are plenty of other causes of neuropathy besides diabetes; I've assumed that's the concern because you've posted under the diabetes support group heading?
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I know a couple of people who suffer with a lot of pain from this. They are both diabetics. (I am a Type I diabetic and thank goodness, no neuropathy yet.) They both take medication for it. I'd check with a Endocrinologist about it and also to see if they can help with getting better control of their blood sugar levels.
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It is the nerves dieing. The pain is caused by the death of the nerves.

It is quite common in diabetics. Nerve death in them is cause by sugar overload.
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I wish I could resolve mine that way - as it is I take roughly 20 different vitamins and other supplements daily - with all the B's being fully represented.
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While my experience and conclusion might be challenged by medical professional or others who have had neuropathy, mine was diagnosed through an EMG, with no definable cause, but abated after I increased my B vitamin consumption, not b/c of the neuropathy but for other reasons. It occasionally flares up when I'm not consuming enough B vitamin foods.

Challenge all you may, but that's my experience and I believe there's a connection between the B foods and neuropathy that's not induced by nerve or diabetic issues.
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A numbness sometimes accompanied by a "pins and needles" type of tingling pain - kinda feels like when your leg has gone to sleep. It's caused by nerve damage and is usually in the feet or hands. Lucky me - I also have a wide strip of it that runs the back of one of my legs - starts at the hip and goes all the way down to the bottom of my foot ending at my toes. It is sometimes treatable but there is no cure. It can often be found in older folks with diabetes. I got mine from a back injury.
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