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Sometimes I am lost for ideas for her. i.e. stuffing envelopes. And she lost her self motivation to do really anything.

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If she has a need to have an "in home job".. my dad loved to sort things.. coins, cards , envelopes! Dosen't matter if they get it right
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I love the library idea if she can still read aloud. They love volunteers, and so many children love to snuggle with a "grandparent". And so many children no longer have a grandmother who lives nearby. My father loved children ( he was a teacher) but he could no longer follow the story...
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I know a lot of churches and groups make no-sew fleece blankets for charity. Apparently they are easy to make and involve tying rather than sewing. This may be something she could work on as a home project or at some location in the community with some assistance. Especially with cold weather and holidays coming up this could be a good prject.
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Oh, no, I totally lost the first part of my answer!

Political parties love envelope stuffers. With all the Republican candidates gearing up now, there are a lot of solicitations coming in the mail. But it is repetitive and monotonous work. And in my experience in working on campaigns, they also might hit on your mother for donations, so make sure she doesn't take a checkbook if she volunteers for this work.

Local charities may have a need for envelope stuffers. If you're in the DC/Virginia area, the big beltway bandit fundraisers would have a big need for envelope stuffers as well.
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Depending on the state of her dementia, could she still read? I ask because I've become aware of a reading program in which children read to dogs. Apparently the dogs are relaxed by the sound of a child's voice, and the children get nonjudgmental practice in reading. I was thinking this would be a good way for an elder person to read aloud, while petting a dog and receiving the benefit of animal therapy at the same time.

Back in the home, folding towels seems to be a good pastime as it's reasonably consistent, tactile (especially the plush towels), and needs to be done.

I think there are two dovetailing ways to identify tasks: (1) everything that you do that she could help you with, and (2) what did she used to enjoy that you could raise to the level of activity?

If you crochet or knit, can she wind the balls for easier use? If you sew, can she fold the fabrics so that they're not exposed to sun? If you garden, can she water the plants?

What do YOU do that she can share, if only in a small participating role?
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isnt it hard? I remember feeling sooo bad that mom had nothing to do. Funny, though, I don't think it really bothered her...my house was never so clean when she lived with me. I washed knick-knacks and had her dry them. I set her up at the kitchen table to help me peel potatoes...cut up veggies for salad or stew...fold towels and underwear...match socks...clean our jewelry...I bought magazines for her to page thru (her ability to process what she saw in them was limited).

Mom wouldn't have been able to work jigsaw puzzles. Maybe yours is? A TV tray and a large-piece puzzle maybe? Polishing silver? I'll bet others will have lots more ideas.
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