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My mom can't walk anymore, so I transfer her from the wheelchair to her recliner and the bedside commode. We've had a couple of close calls due to her lack of balance when I get her standing and a caregiver that comes once a week is having a hard time transferring her. We tried a Hoyer Lift, but that doesn't work well when trying to get her on the commode. It's difficult to pull her pants down. I have seen different lifts at the hospital and nursing home, but I'm not sure which type would work better in this situation. Any advice?

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I'm a nurse with experience in lifts, transfers & psychiatric patients. There are many options in transfers and what's best all depends on how much your mother can help physically, mentally understand and comply with what you are needing, and emotionally withstand the move. Also the physical & mental ability of the person doing the transfers has to be considered.
I HIGHLY recommend you have a Physical Therapist evaluate her and your home situation (the logistics of your home bathroom, bed...). They can then make recommendations on safest and easiest way to move her, customized for your home, as needed. They can teach you how to transfer your mom safely. You'd be amazed at how much easier things can be if you know the tricks-of-the-trade.
I believe way to have this type of evaluation is for moms doctor to write an order for a Home Health Agency (you can pick which one you want to use) to send Physical Therapist out for evaluation. Then Medicare and/or private insurance should pay, I believe.
There are Medical Equipment companies in most towns of any size that have lifts, .... you'd need. They are also good at making sure you get what's needed & sell it, plus may rent equipment out.
There are Sit-To-Stand lifts, Hoyer lifts (with different types of slings),.... however, WHOEVER IS USING THE LIFT MUST MUST MUST KNOW HOW TO USE IT PROPERLY.
If you get a lift, of any kind, make sure a professional (company's professional when delivered, Physical Therapist, &/or Nurse teach you how to use it.)
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Thank you all for these answers, very helpful.
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Best care Stand Assist Lift is what I use for my mother. When she was in nursing home, they used this which they called Sirita lift for toileting from wheelchair to toilet or commode.
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drkernisan, I have used Hoyer and hoyer type lifts with the toileting sling.
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I use Traxx 500. Want more info email me.
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@mar126, what kind of lift do you use with this sling?

This sounds like it could be a good solution for some people facing similar challenges.
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Molift Quick Raiser - Sit To Stand Patient Lift. https://www.quickie-wheelchairs.com/Therapy-Living-Aids/Patient-Lifts/Sit-to-Stand-Lifts/Molift-Quick-Raiser-1-Sit-To-Stand-Patient-Lift/38837p

I jut help a friend of mine sell this machine and she used it on her BIG husband for about 5 years. she said it was a life (back) saver.

something to think about at least.
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If 2 people are having difficulty, how much does she weigh? Is she pulling you at risk for injury? You might want to ask her doctor for an in home PT evaluation to ensure that you are still doing things correctly
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I use a Bestcare toileting sling to transfer my husband. The sling wraps under the legs and under the arms. It is a little over a hundred dollars on the internet from Pro Therapy. My husband is paralyzed on one side and has advanced dementia so he is no help. I move the bed to a sitting position and work the sling behind his back and under his arms. The leg straps go under his thighs, right above the knee. Since you don't have to go under the backside, turning isn't necessary. I've used these slings for over a year, making 4 to 6 transfers a day with minimal effort. I move him from the bed to the shower/commode chair, removing his diaper before sitting him on the chair. The chair is then rolled into the shower or rolled over the toilet if it is time for a bowel movement. To dress, I bring the pull-ups as far up his legs as possible before placing the sling. While he is suspended on the lift, it is easy the work an part of the pull-ups out from under the leg straps. For pants, I use knit shorts that have zippers on both sides. Oddly, none of the health care bathing aids or even the hospice nurses have seen this sling before.
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I haven't used a lift but I considered it and consequently did a lot of research. There are special slings designed for toileting, check youtube for a video.
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I should think it's impossible to pull your mother's pants down once she's already in the sling for the Hoyer lift. At the risk of stating the obvious, can you not work out a routine that protects her dignity but involves removing her lower garments before placing the sling? I found warm, generously-sized strategically-placed towels helpful with this - you can tuck one around her waist throughout the transfer process.
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