Is obsessive compulsive behavior common for the elderly and how do caregivers help and cope? - AgingCare.com

Is obsessive compulsive behavior common for the elderly and how do caregivers help and cope?

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Mom is 85 and obsesses about many occasions and situations. My sister and I try to avoid giving her too much information ahead of time because she will go on and on about what, when and where? Is there a forum on line to help us deal with this behavior. She also cuts up papers, plastic soda bottles and re-arranges my refrigerator when she visits. She lives in the garage apartment on my sister and brother-in-law's property but when my sister goes out of town overnight Mom stays with me.

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I am 57..I have OCD for cleaning...There is medication..but it turns me into a zombie....I am a Maid..so all my clients homes are Better Homes and Gardens Ready all the time...From the floor Vents to the Rafters you cannot find a bit of dust..from the Sink Drains and stoppers to each fork, knife and spoon, lined up perfectly...every shoe shinned and in place...While at home..I am recovering till I go back to clean...I am frustrated at my own home!!!! It is not easy...You cannot always control it...With all obsessions..YOU CAN CHANGE THE OBSESSION if you want to..Give them a Something to do..depending on the age of the person...it has to be something they can be caught up in...a deck of cards and solitaire...A pen to write letters to a list of friends..any child's game like a memory game..or spider solitaire...tic tac toe...with a bean bag toss...if crafty get them started in the 1 store Velvet painting where they use a Pen to fill in the color......buy 2 or 3..and do one with them...and display the art...giving a color book and crayons and do a page in your own...MAKE memories...ask them to DATE the page.....they color..YOU would be surprised...bring out beauty..and creativity...the dollar tree has these small things without spending a mint...the OCD might kick in...and learn to paint or do art...THE ICON that you see on this page with name is a PAINTING I DID in OILS I did not even know I could do anything..this is just one of my painting....TRY IT 2 dollars one for the crayons..one for the color book...sometimes...we never get to be a child..till we are all grown up!!! what could it hurt...
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It is advised to baby proof your home/apartment, cabinet doors, drawers, with AD,
those OCD's are terrible.
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My mom acts like she has OCD--she 96 and has dementia and drove me nuts while she was still living with me. After I went to bed at night, she'd be up all night long rearranging everything in the house. I'd spend 30 to 45 minutes every day in the kitchen trying to find where she put things so I could begin cooking! What an aggravation. In my mom's case, I think she realizes that she has something wrong with her thinking processes and compensates by keeping physically busy. But, it disrupts the entire household. It's impossible to keep anything organized and in one location, as most people do, so you can get your work done efficiently.
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My mother never showed signs of OCD but since she's been in a NH the past year she's become a "picker". She's deteriorated terribly and had another stroke 3 months ago. When the NH had a bus trip to Walmart (before the stroke) I had to watch where I wheeled her between the rows and she'd keep picking and grabbing at things. Didn't want them, just picking. Visiting yesterday I noticed she kept running her fingers over her chin and picking - for chin hair or something imaginary? If I get close enough lately she picks at my clothes and goes down my pockets with no rhyme or reason.
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I agree OCD behavior was there already only nobody noticed it now that it is getting in the way, you get it...

Old people do not being shuffled around, why don't you stay by your mother when your sister goes out of town, it would be easier for both you and her.
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Maybe we need to stop obsessing over a parent's OCD. I believe we all have a tiny bit of OCD in us that isn't all that noticeable to the general public or even our friends.

My Dad [92] likes to cut out and save newspaper articles, and put them into notebooks depending on subject. I feel that keeps him busy and up-to-date with the world news.

In the past few years, my parents re-use table napkins over and over again, probably a throwback to the Great Depression. I find that gross but then again they are both in their 90's so apparently it isn't harmful.
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Mom is very elderly in her early ninties and become very forgetful. No dementia.
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I wouldn't say these are OCD traits as much as it is the generation she comes from which includes the Great Depression. Everyone had to save, save, save. Whatever she is thinking, her thinking must tell her to get things in order and don't waste stuff (especially food). What's so bad about rearranging a refrigerator. She can come to my house anytime. Mention it to her doctor on next visit, since you do not say whether she has a "dementia" diagnosis. Just love her for who she is right now. That's all any of us can do anyway...
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The last 2 years that Mom had lived me, Mom would
keep every piece of mail that arrived to our residence. I have spent time off and on since last August cleaning out Mom's closets and drawers and destroying junk that has magically appeared everyplace! I have reorganized photos and letters that Mom will not see again. I am now reorganizing Christmas and other cards by family and friends categories, deciding which ones are worth keeping or ones that may be destroy to clear out some of the clutter from our condo. PV
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My husband is going through the same thing with his 94 yr old father.and 92 yr old mother. One hates to say the word hoarder but considering their inability to clean out their stuff now, items just are piling up without their letting us help. The father did the cooking for the past 10 years (at least) and for breakfast they ate a half a banana and peanut butter toast, evenly sliced in rectangles. For lunch at 2:00, they had rice and beans. He has always been a controlling person. Demeaning to his family and is in denial of his current condition. Beekybird - this man has 20 days of rehab currently after taking a serious fall. Hopefully this center has a psycho/behaviorist as this could be beneficial. With OCD/Dementia has anyone ever heard of one becoming so angry that there is physical violence?
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