Can my mom (83) get financial assistance for taking care of a roommate (95) in a private home? - AgingCare.com

Can my mom (83) get financial assistance for taking care of a roommate (95) in a private home?

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My low income mom was asked to move in w/a 95 y/o rent free in her home in exchange for cooking, driving to doctor appts, being a companion, etc. She shares utility costs & food costs at a monthly cost to her of about $500-$600 a month. Her social security payment is $1400/month and she still has about $500/mo in other costs (car pmt, insurance) and misc bills. Though she does not pay rent, she is paying more in fiod & utilities sharing a big house than she did when on her own. She is currently waiting for section 8 to come thru.

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please don't take this the wrong way, but who in this 95 year old family asked your mother of 83 to take care of "their" mother? the 95 year old family should have contacted their local agency of aging and set something up thru them, filed for Medicaid, etc. That's a lot to ask of someone 83 to take care of a 95, now if it was their spouse, that would be different. And your mother shouldn't have to pay for anything, since she is caring for the 95. You need to help your mother in this situation before she runs out of her own money, then what happens? what happens if this 95 y/o has to end up in hospital and then NH, where does your mother go? with the "other" family kick her out? lots of things here to investigate.
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re: Getting paid as a caregiver
Originally only 15 states participated. Now 49 states offer at least one of four options. New law went into effect last summer.

The names of these programs vary in each state, making it often difficult to find them. In Montana, it is called "Big Sky Bonanza" in Ohio "PASSPORT" and in Washington "New Freedom Program".... which makes no sense, but that is what they are called.

Qualifications may vary from state to state, as with any program, and many individuals qualify.

You often have to ask for these programs, as they may not be volunteer offered.
I qualified while caring for my parents, yet no one ever told me about it, and I never rec'd any payment because I never knew I was able to.

Really hope this helps, as my intention was to offer options that you may not have been aware of. For no other reason. I didn't want you to go through what I did, and miss available help to assist you.

I don't want to cause any controversy or problems, and perhaps it's best that I remove myself from the conversations.

Thanks for your input.
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re: Free food.
Yes, there are places in every state that provide free food, without having to go through food stamps, etc. Some of these places are St. Mary's Food Bank, Feeding America, Seniors Farmer's Market Nutritional Program, and more.

I was coming from the perspective of a caregiver having to prepare the meals for a loved one. I know budgets can be tight, and every little bit helps.

If you check with your local county, they often have a list of places to obtain food.
No, it is not only canned goods etc. They often provide meat, produce, and more.

Where I live, there is a place to obtain 60 pounds of fresh produce for $10... and all the food is fresh, no income requirements, and this food is salvaged from being tossed away, as it may not meet the perfect shape, size, that supermarkets purchase.

Meals on Wheels is for those that live in their homes alone, and cannot easily cook for themselves. They do rely on donations (usually about $3 per meal), but if a person cannot pay, they may still be able to obtain the food.

Does this information help?
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Garden Artist:
Yes, I wrote a book. No, my intention was not 'hawking' as I thought I would just share what I know. Not so simple to supply specific info, as each state and county varies as to criteria, names and more. Apologize for how it may have come across.
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First of all, I would like to apologize for any misunderstanding regarding the information I shared. I will address each question individually.

Thanks for the info on the Workman's Comp
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I think it would be very helpful if posters would give specifics about so called "free" stuff if they infact know of its existance. As garden and arianne gave specific names of programs a person could look up and possibly benefit from. Just stating there are all kinds of "free" things is very frustrating to people who are already frustrated at finding help. Just MOP
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Arianne, I think the "free food" might have referred to organizations such as Forgotten Harvest, Focus Hope and others. But my understanding was that, like Michigan's Bridge Card for food, they're income qualified.

MOW isn't free here either. The cost is nominal, but it's most definitely not free.

Guess you have to buy her book to know.
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Lassie --
About the "free food." I believe that the meals in question were those provided by the Meals on Wheels program, which varies from state to state. In my state, Florida, it may be free to some recipients, but there is a charge to those who can pay. It provides one meal a day. I've never tried it because the recipient has to guarantee to be home to receive delivery during set hours.
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I'm curious as to what states pay for all this 'caregiving', providing compensation for taking care of the disabled, if not from a licensed agency. I'm curious as to where all this 'free food' comes from - church pantries? A bag potatoes, jar of peanut butter, some canned goods, and a loaf of day old bread are 'free food' - is the 83 year old going to be prepping and cooking? The whole thing just sounds so so wrong, like a disaster waiting to happen, if not now in a couple of years.
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"If your mother is taking care of someone, and that person is disabled, she can receive money compensation for her efforts, if she is that person's caregiver." Camilles.

Edited my last post to add that I too question Camille's statement that the OP's mother can receive caregiver compensation if the person is disabled, unless Camille's referring to some specific disability allotment of which FF and I are unaware.

I think though that people who ask about being paid are inquiring about specific sources, i.e., the names of the programs, whether state specific, etc. I've done a lot of research and found no way I could be paid for caregiving other than by the person for whom I'm caring. Medicaid is not in the picture for us.

If I'm missing something, so are a lot of other posters here.
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