How long is it ok to leave patient in ceiling hoist or lift with a track system?

Follow
Share

Is it considered a restraint? It's a bit difficult to figure out how bad my Dad's dementia is yet, but he is certainly unable or unwilling to remember to use his walker, and hence at a constant risk of falling. (He came home after a broken hip, and fell within three days.) Nor will he ask for help. So anytime we or caregiver look away or walk into other room he might stand up and fall.

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
19

Answers

Show:
I hear your frustration but not sure your option is viable. You will have to keep him within the "track" system confines, correct? I would be worried about his skin rubbing on the hoist sheet all the time. As an old home care nurse, I just can't imagine what you are saying would work. It sort of "is" a restraint-you are confining him to a certain area attached to a device with hooks and pullies.
Are you serious about doing this or is it an idea of yours that you would want to implement to prevent a fall?
In my opinion he needs 24/7 care and observation- whether he gets it at home with private pay or at a SNF. I don't feel putting someone in the situation you have described is reasonable for his freedom and well being. The idea of a chair with a table is better than this.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My father in law has fallen so many times ( he first refused a cane and then a walker) . The last fall the doctors deemed him unfit to care or make decission for himself and sent him by ambulance to a nursing home. We were not consulted but we're delighted by the decission. This is what we knew was best all along. This was a long two year journey of falls and release- lol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I wasn't saying unattended. Unless you count when I'm using adjoining bathroom myself. Or my mother with phone is there while I walk the dog 300 ft. away.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Sure the meds can be titrated. But with someone who has been so difficult/abusive all his life, there's a pretty fine line. His "normal" with dementia added is pretty difficult no matter what drug cocktail. He's not always a blob, or I wouldn't try so hard not to have him in an institution.
And of course (before anyone asks) he was fitted with excellent hearing aids years ago. No one could convince him to wear them. Before any dementia. (It was a major "success" to even get him into see hearing guy at all.)
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Will this work?
NEVER leave a patient UNATTENDED in a hoist lift.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

On psychiatric meds: My aim with my mom, who has vascular demential post stroke, is to keep her safe, calm and as healthy as she can be. It took a lot of trialing, but she is now on two antidepressants (remeron and lexapro, I think) and some klonopin for anxiety. She gets a fairly low dose of klonopin on a daily basis with more as PRN if she gets agitated. Like over the summer, when she thought she had leprosy......my aim is to keep her out of psychic pain as well as physical.

If your dad is a blob, then talk to the docs about titrating the meds. It CAN be done.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I sympathise again. He really doesn't remember, and he really doesn't think he needs it. I wish more than anything that I had learned faster that this was symptomatic of dementia, and not stubbornness, inattention or some kind of death wish. How long do you expect your father to be in rehab? - because if he's coming home again, now is the time to get an occupational therapist in to recommend safety adaptations like hand rails, grab bars, room layout and so on.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

He doesn't refuse to use walker or say he dislikes it. He just doesn't remember or think he needs it.
A family member is quite connected to the best doctors in Boston. He's been seen by very good doctors, including geriatric. However he himself has always hated almost all doctors, and won't listen. So we can only implement things that don't require his participation or consent.
Yes, it is quite clear he has various psychiatric issues, but that doesn't help keep him from falling. Anti-depressants (after he got to a point where he wasn't clear on what pills he was taking) have been a great help. The reputable rehabilitation place he's in he now also gives some kind of anti-anxiety medication, but it can make a person who was vibrant seem like a blob, which can seem worse to us than an !@#$%^&.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

midrashist, when elders get to a certain point in their life, they will fall, that is what they do. What kind of walker does your Dad have? Is it the type where it it only has one set of wheels on the back?

My Dad didn't use his walker much until I bought him a rolling walker [4 wheels, hand brake, seat, basket]... he loved it, thus would use it more. To him it was the best thing since slice bread... my Dad was also an engineer, and inventor. If he was younger, he'd probably invent something to make life easier for elders.

Now mind you, occasionally Dad would forget to use his walker, it is just something elder will do. And there is no way for caregivers to be glued to the hip to make sure they don't fall. Just hope it is a soft landing.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Has he been seen by a geriatric psychiatrist? It sounds as though there are pre-existing psychiatric conditions which might be ameliorated by meds.

Frankly, I would arrange for a long term care facility. This does not sound like an undertaking for amateurs.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions