Would it be good to give a diabetic beet juice and carrot and other things in the juicer?

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He has a tumor in his lung want to give him good nourishment.

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8 ounces of Boathouse Farms 100% Carrot juice has 14 grams of carbs, including one gram of fiber. (In 1996 canned juice may have typically had additives.) That is about 2 medium carrots.

I understand that some "juicers" incorporate the fiber, which would be a good thing.

But basically, whether he chews the raw carrot himself or has a machine turn it into liquid, you need to pay attention to the total amount of carbs you are giving the diabetic at one time.

maryellen13, if you are somewhat new at preparing food for a diabetic, you may find it very helpful to have a session with a Certified Diabetes Educator. All health insurance must cover this. Go in with the person you are caring for, or if it is too difficult for him to go in, explain the situation to the clinic and see if there is some way you can have a session on his behalf.
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I would not do this without discussing it with a nutritionist. The concentrated juices may create a dangerous sugar spike. Beets and carrots are high in sugar.
Suggestion: count how many beets, carrots, even apples are used to make one serving. Look up the value in a carb-calorie counter reference, like "Book of food counts" by Dr. Art Ulene. The one I have was printed in 1996, but is still useful.
The type of veggie or fruit used makes a big difference, raw, canned, sliced, etc.
Here's one example:
carrot juice canned: 6oz.= 74 cal, 1.8gms protein, 17.1gms. carbs , 53mgs. sodium, 0.3gms fat, 0 chol.
Raw- 1 medium carrot = 7.3gms carbs
I think they forgot about home juicing machines when this book was written, but carbs are sugar. I would give these in very limited amounts.
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The main negative about juice is that with no fiber, it allows the sugar to be absorbed more quickly. But if he likes it, and won't eat whole or chopped veg's, why not?
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Why not?

Figure out the carb count and try to stay within his meal plan allotment.
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