Is anyone aware of a connection between dementia and digestive problems in a person?

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I've heard that with dementia the body "forgets" things.

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LadyCoco: I agree...excellent post!
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As a person's Alzheimer's progresses, there an indeed be digestive problems. The brain is the body's command center....EVERYTHING we do is because the brain is sending a command to do it...eat, sleep, eliminate, talk, blink, etc. As the brain signals deteriorate as with Alzheimers, the body does not function as it should. Vital organs do not function properly because they are not getting proper signals any longer.
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typo, 8/19. not 6/19
See how much we need AC to fix the date stamps?
Today is 8/21/2016 1:25 a.m. PDT
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Babalou, I would be very interested in reading more about the Mayo Clinic studies about Celiac and dementia, could you send me some links?
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Send: There was nothing except a date from June and a time.
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6/19/2016 4:45 p.m. PDT
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Aging and Digestive Health
By Brenda Conaway
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Andrew Seibert, MD
WebMD Feature Archive

Getting older has pluses and minuses. On the plus side, you get more time to relax and enjoy life. On the minus side lie many health challenges -- including an increase in digestive health disorders. Of course, problems with digestion can occur at any age. Yet nearly 40% of older adults have one or more age-related digestive symptom each year.

Here's an overview of common digestive health problems that may arise with age. Learn why they occur and what you can do to keep your digestive system running smoothly well into your later years.

Digestive Problems as You Age

Constipation. One of the most common things we see, certainly as people are getting into their 60s and 70s, may be a change in bowel habits, predominantly more constipation," says Ira Hanan, MD, associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago Medical Center. Symptoms include difficult or painful bowel movements, infrequent bowel movements, and hard, dry stool. There are a number of age-related factors that can cause constipation in older adults.
Changes in the digestive system. Your digestive system moves food through your body by a series of muscle contractions. Just like squeezing a toothpaste tube, these contractions push food along your digestive tract, Hanan says. As we age, this process sometimes slows down, and this can cause food to move more slowly through the colon. When things slow down, more water gets absorbed from food waste, which can cause constipation.
Medication use. Older adults take a lot of medications, says Ellen Stein, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, MD. And as we age, we start to have more health problems that require medications. Several common medications can cause constipation. One example is calcium channel blockers, used for high blood pressure. "Very good for blood pressure, very constipation causing," says Stein. Narcotic pain relievers are another common culprit. An older adult who has knee or hip replacement surgery will often be given narcotics for pain. "Narcotics have effects directly on the bowel," Stein tells Web MD. "They actually slow the gut."
Inactivity. People often become less active as they age, says Stein, and being inactive can make you constipated. Bed rest during an illness can cause real problems. If a person has joint-replacement surgery, for example, it takes time to recover and be fully active again. Add narcotic pain relievers to the mix, and "that might change manageable constipation into something that's much more of a problem," Stein says.
Not drinking enough fluids. Staying hydrated helps prevent constipation at any age. It can become more of an issue for older adults who take diuretics for high blood pressure or heart failure. Diuretics lower blood pressure by causing you to lose excess fluid by urinating more often. Some people may avoid drinking too many fluids so they don't have to run to the bathroom all day long. Between urinating more and drinking less, you can become dehydrated.
Diverticular Disease. About half of people age 60 and older have diverticulosis. This occurs when small pouches in the lining of the colon bulge out along weak spots in the intestinal wall. While many people don't have any symptoms, gas, bloating, cramps, and constipation may occur. "I tell my patients its part of the aging of the colon," Hanan tells WebMD. "As we get older, we're more prone to developing these pockets." Why they occur with age is unclear, he says. While most of the time they don't cause a problem and don't require treatment, they can cause scarring and irregularity. If the pockets become inflamed, it's called diverticulitis, which can cause abdominal pain, cramping, fever, chills, nausea, and vomiting. Antibiotics, pain medications, and a liquid diet treat diverticulitis.
Ulcers &NSAIDs. Many older adults use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to control pain from arthritis and other types of chronic pain. Regular use of NSAIDs increases the risk for stomach bleeding and ulcers. So while aging alone doesn't make your stomach more prone to ulcers, the chronic use of NSAIDs does raise your risk. More often than not older patients don't have pain from ulcers, says Hanan, but they can have painless gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. If you notice any type of stomach bleeding, such as vomiting blood, passing dark stools, or noticing blood when you wipe, tell your doctor right away.
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The brain controls the body. So, for a better word, as parts of the brain die so does the function of that part of the brain. The first thing that seems to go with dementia is being hungry and thirsty. The brain no longer signals these. So u have to make sure the person eats and drinks. With memory loss they don't remember if they did or not. Some lose taste and smell. Stomach problems come with getting older. A person may not be able to tolerate foods they used to eat. Things like acidity foods and coffee may contribute to acid reflux which needed to be doctor because can cause cancer.
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Wow....awesome discussuin...explanations. Hats off to all the professionals, veterans, and infantry folks who respond to our questions on this site. You are my daily early morning read with coffee.
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@Fisherman..a question for you...
What specific digestive problems are you asking about.
Is it about constipation, diarrhea, eating in general...? A little more info might yield a more detailed answer.
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