My mom has had many delusional emotional support and feelings, could this be dementia?

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She feels left out from things, my dad and her have been divorced for 24 years and she feels that she should be invitedone when his mother and him plan gatherings. She is talking about things that never had happened in either my sister's or my life..... she has had breakdowns even when nothing has happened. Is this depression? I deal with mental health but, I believe her mother had dementia. I'm not sure if I need to send her somewhere for an evaluation of some kind or what. She's very emotionally detached. She is on antidepressants currently

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Has your mom suffered with depression for many years? Her symptoms could be the result of many causes. It's difficult to say. Maybe, she needs a complete physical exam. Cognitive decline can come from different things, like UTI, illnesses, infections, medications, etc.

Do you attend doctor appointments with her? Do you live near her? I might try to spend a few days with her in her house. That would enable you to really observe her behavior. You can see if she's preparing meals, has spoiled food in the fridge, is paying her bills, is bathing, doing laundry, cleaning and taking her medication. See if there's any damage to her car. I might accompany her in public. Go out for lunch, see a movie, chat with others to see if her short term memory is in tact and if she's able to focus and act appropriately. IMO, it's vital to know what they are really like before you ask them to get an evaluation. A doctor may ask them a lot of questions, but if they lie to the doctor, how will he know, unless a family member is available to tell them otherwise.

Can you chat with her friends and neighbors. Sometimes, they know a lot, but aren't sure how to share it with the adult children.

My cousin told the doctor that she was able to prepare meals, pay bills, take medications, etc. but, the doctor knew that wasn't true, because I had already prepared a memo of what I had observed and gave it to the doctor before the visit. Upon more careful questioning, the cognitive decline became obvious.

Getting the truth as to her situation would go a long way in helping her get the correct diagnosis, imo.
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