Any tips for trying to change a combative person with dementia by yourself?

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Talk to their primary doctor. Have an evaluation done. Yes, some drugs have very bad side affects, but some can be a life saver. And as with a lot of answers I have seen, it may be time for a move into a nursing home. Take a CNA class if you can and get trained in proper movement. But even with proper training, you still can get punched, kicked, scratched or bit. It is all going to depend on how much abuse you can take. And if it is too much, find a facility.
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ummm...that was "crystal ball"....I hate that you can not change an error in spelling....
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@seenypa..Do NOT feel guilty unless you have a crystal bally. You have no way of knowing for sure that the decline he had would not have occurred at the same rate. It may have been just his rate of decline and the medication had nothing to do with it.
As caregivers we have enough on our plates without second guessing decisions that we make at a particular period in time. I am sure that all the decisions you made were the right ones at the time. So please do not feel guilty about it. Give yourself a pat on the back for being a kind and loving caregiver.
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1RareFind: You're right on point! You might as well be talking to the wall!
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My dad wasn't combative, just more difficult and refused to listen to reason. He always walked out. At the AL they asked for a specific pill, Respiridahl, and the doctor initially prescribed Alzam. This calmed him down very quickly, but in hindsight I feel awful for agreeing to it, not knowing the downside to it. His muscles stiffened in leass than 10 months to the point where he could no longer walk and it has also affected his brain for the worse faster. I feel guilty and hate myself for what it's done to him. Maybe you could try a calming tablet, but be careful at the same time.
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you can't change a combative person with dementia, run! Yep, run for the hills because it's just a waste of time. You just can't change someone like that, they need to be in a proper facility with staff who are specifically and uniquely trained to deal with these matters
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You have to be a trained medical professional to do what you're asking.
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You can put him in the hospital due to altered mental state. In fact, if this is something new you should do that to see the cause. Maybe he has infection. If physical causes are ruled out he will need medications to control his aggression--even in a nursing home this is a must because if he's aggressive they will hospitalize him anyway. If the aggression continues the nursing home will kick him out.
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Just a quick thought. Whatever you do, if a person has asthma or other allergies, please be careful what you use or have in the room. My granddaughter is allergic to lavender, I am allergic to a lot of scents. One of my daughters is allergic to corn and corn products. This includes corn starch that my mother insisted on using on her when she was a baby. It caused huge boils on her little bottom. I couldn't leave her with mom because mom said she HAD to powder her bottom with something and she was allergic to everything.
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Sorry, in my mean and selfish opinion, once they don't even know where they are, who you are, are bedridden and incontinent, and are now combative with dementia, their days of 'living at home' have come to an end. I would start looking for a placement somewhere. In the meantime, tell the patient's doctor and see if some calming meds can be given.
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