Can liver cirrhosis cause blood sugar levels to escalate?

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Years of untreated diabetes appear to be the cause of my 64 year old husbands liver failure. Acites was the first clue. Every few months he has esophageal varices banded. He bruises easily. He takes insulin for his diabetes but in the last few months it has been skyrocketing. The doctors reprimand him for not being more careful with his diet. Yet we are being very careful. I wondered if the unfiltered poison in his body could be causing his blood sugar levels to spike into the 300 and 400 levels? I’m so worried.

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That's a tough thing to do deal with. How long has he had diabetes? I am Type I. I've read that even with Type II's, they may need quite a bit more insulin over time. I have a friend who is Type II in his early 70's and he has just added fast acting insulin to his long acting. (Doctor's orders.) He's doing much better. I'd consult with an Endocrinologist. I have the best in the world, imo. To me, it's invaluable. I know it's tough to add one more specialists, but, if those blood sugar levels can get in a good range......it makes a world of difference.  I hope you can find some remedies. 
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Thank you all for your answers. Salt intake was immediately cut out of his diet as much as we possibly could. Also fluid intake is limited and measured. He weighs daily and records it. He lost over 100 lbs this past year watching his diet closely. Luckily only once has he had to be hospitalized since diagnosis. We have discussed diet with dietitians who seem to struggle with what is best for liver disease patients. My husband has 3 doctors...a G.P. A local specialist and a Stanford specialist. His cirrhosis is non-alcoholic . Fatty liver disease along with diabetes left untreated( for a while ) were the causes according to the two specialists. I appreciate the websites you have mentioned and will continue to educate myself on all the aspects of this dreadful disease. God bless you.
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Your husband is so young and to be reprimanded by his doctor only makes me wonder how companionate is his doctor. Would it be time to seek another doctor maybe the insurance company could make some recommendations. I changed doctors a half dozen times when I was younger until I found my current doc which I highly value. Good luck and keep strong for your husband. (((Hugs)))
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Yes liver disease can effect blood sugar. Look up “conversion of glucose (sugar) to glucagon in the liver” on Google. Often people with liver disease develop diabetes if they did not have it before the liver disease was diagnosed. 

However, liver failure is rarely caused by diabetes. What caused your husband’s  liver disease? Esophageal varices often are the result of excessive alcohol intake over years that wear down the normal esophageal mucosa. They in themselves are life threatening. 

Treating liver disease will be ongoing. Ascites often reoccurs frequently. Liver disease effects blood clotting time as well (prolongs it). Swelling in the legs can develop as well. 

Take it day by day and treat the symptoms as they appear. It’s often a long haul as symptoms can vary as well as recurrence episodes of ascites. You may want to weigh him daily and report weight gains to his doctor. Usually a red flag is gaining 3lbs in 3 Days. Ask his doctor for parameters & what & when to report weight gains to the doctor. 

The old saying “liver is life” is correct.

Good luck! His high blood sugars can be treated with sliding scale insulin but have to be checked often several times a day.

Also limit salt intake. Ask your husband ‘s doctors for any other diet restrictions and what his daily sodium intake should be.
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Find a more compassionate doctor. Many patients are non-compliant but doctors should not assume that everyone is, without some discussion.

Search for "cirrhosis and diabetes life expectancy" (don't type the quote marks). You will find several articles that will help you understand this disease combination.

I am so sorry that you and your husband are dealing with this.
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