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have read it could be Vit D deficiency and the elderly need more Vit D?

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I think TV contributes to Alzheimers.
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Salt is another factor. Refined salt is a bad thing, and will jack-up blood pressure, for instance.
Good quality sea salt is a big step better, but it can still be a problem for many.
Himalayan pink salt, though seems to be different: it does not usually raise blood pressure up at all--it seems instead to better regulate BP. Of course, that must include other healthy choices and habits.
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It's not just the nutrients necessary [and there are far more than gov't agencies admit to; their MDR's only list a fraction of what we really need].
We require the right things to help enzyme processes break down and transport nutrients to where they should be.
For instance, one can take plenty of D3 to get the levels up, and that does some good, BUT...to get that D3 to help move minerals to the bones, instead of making plaque arteries, or moving plaques out of the arteries, it requires consuming plenty of K2 complex, and/or Natto. Most people who are deficient in D, it's related to the hormone interrupting chemicals in our environments blocking ability to use it--vit. D is a hormone, more than a nutrient---hoards of chemicals we live with are hormone interruptors...of ALL our hormones from doing their jobs---insulin and thyroid included.
Natto [Nattokinase is the capsule] does a nice job of clearing plaqued arteries, but does even better in conjunction with D3, and better yet, if you eat enough actual vegetables it comes from.
Digestive enzymes become increasingly deficient with age, which leads to more ills, since foods cannot be properly digested. Taking antacids calms symptoms for a bit, but impairs digestion more, and impairs nutrient absorption.. Taking digestive enzymes actually helps digest the food and helps access the nutrients in the foods, so we then stop craving too many calories, and our bodies can lose excess fat more easily, as well as accomplish loads of other body chemistries better.
Sugar, and foods that quickly turn into sugar [like flour and potatoes], are inflammatory. Inflammation feeds Alzheimer's plaque-building, as well as every other disease-process.
Cutting out sugars, and cutting out grains if you have to, means the body can relax some, and process things better, because it has less garbage to deal with, and is not then making certain chemicals to cope with the inflammation response triggered by sugars.
Amazing healing and relief can be had, just by removing sugars and grains. Then, adding pertinent nutrients and/or digestive enzymes, can be of great help. Digestive enzymes, for some, are a great 1-step help. Probiotics bigger variety and counts, are another singular great help for most, if one can only afford to do one thing.
But at some point, if Alz. has already done the damages, not much we know how to do, can help more. More time is needed, more approaches needed, and they don't always have that.
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There is a strong link between a diet high in carbohydrates (meaning sugars and starches) and brain disorders, to include mood and dementia. The brain is approximately 60% fat, and it needs natural dietary fat (not man-made fat, like trans fats and margarine)) to be healthy. The emphasis on a low-fat, high carb diet has done enormous harm on Americans' brain health, as well as overall health.
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Capt your shrooms will be popping up soon. Do you mail order?
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if shrooms or lsd tabs are part of your diet trippin id a guarantee..
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The oldest People on record Who lived in Ireland came from the Castlecove, Derrynane regions of South County Kerry. Experts believe this is due to the way that They lived. Plenty exercise, through walking long distances, and hard physical work, also They were terrific dancers. Their diet of plenty fish, and home cured bacon, with lots of vegetables from Their kitchen garden, plus Their own eggs too. They were a very thrifty generation, self sufficient, and They knew how to live. My Generation could learn an awful lot from Them.
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From "Facing Alzheimer’s with Strength and Grace
A GUIDE FOR FAMILY CAREGIVERS

Top 7 Alzheimer’s Myths:
1. Alzheimer’s and dementia are the same thing Dementia is the overarching term used to describe conditions that cause cognitive difficulties. Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia.
2. Memory loss is a normal part of aging occasional slips may become more common with age, but the severe memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s is not normal.
3. Alzheimer’s is preventable with diet and exercise healthy lifestyle habits are important for successful aging, but nothing has been shown to successfully prevent Alzheimer’s.
4. Alzheimer’s only affects old people approximately five million Americans have Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (EOAD), which can occur in people in their 30s, 40s and 50s.
5. There’s an “Alzheimer’s gene” The APOE4 gene may increase EOAD risk, but it doesn’t guarantee a person will develop the disease.
6. Coconut oil can cure Alzheimer’s individual reports of the benefits of coconut oil for people with Alzheimer’s exist, however, there is currently no cure for the disease.
7. Brain puzzles can slow down Alzheimer’s puzzles may help keep a person’s mind active, but they can’t effectively prevent or slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s.
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My Mom is 78-years old and has been diagnosed as having moderate dementia. Last year, I was watching this program that had a "Neurologist-Nutritionist" speaking about AZ/Dementia, a few other diseases and food. BAD food: processed and sugar at the top and then he named off good foods we should add to our diet: darker greens, avocado, certain nuts, coconut oil, omega-3 (salmon), etc (I did not list everything- just tried to do a recall). Well since that time, I have added more of GOOD items to our diet and I don't know if it has made a difference with my Mom and her dementia but I will say it has made a difference with our bowel movements. I have wondered if our way of thinking has something to do with the dementia because my MOM speaks "negative" ALL THE TIME and this isn't new, I've known her to be like this as far back as I can remember and that has me saying "hmmmm, is this possibly a factor?!" I honestly thought one moment she was possessed!
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My mother salted her food too much.
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It would be helpful for you to check out the "Know The Cause" website by Doug Kaufmann. Rather than repeat his expertise, I will let any of you who are curious read his findings. I have to say that I have found Doug's research and findings extremely fruitful for my life. I just wish my mother would understand instead of thinking that anyone who does not eat like her is a "food snob". If you keep doing what you've always done, you have to expect the same results. If you want different results, you have to do something different.
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After reading all these posts, I have to say that my father is the poster child for good eating/exercise habits for the last 50 years of his life. Mother always served balanced meals with fresh fruits/vegetables and steered clear of fast food/frozen dinners. He ate salmon, broccoli, and berries long before they were "health foods", doesn't eat many sweets, and started life-long habits of jogging/working out in his 30s. TV bores him, so he was always active around the house and outside. Drinks one cup of coffee/day (morning) and is affected by the weather. I tell him he is "solar powered" because his energy/focus is in direct proportion to the sunlight. Has had one minor stroke and a couple of TIAs. Been diagnosed with moderate AZ and vascular dementia. On very limited medication - aspirin and Lipitor. All of his health numbers (BP, pulse, cholesterol, etc.) are normal. His weaknesses are salt (due to a salt-restricted diet in childhood), ice cream in moderation, and 10 years of drinking Coke in aluminum cans. He's now drinking low sugar juice. I think AZ is a combination of polluted water, air and chemicals in the food supply as well as genetic susceptibility and isolation. There is no substitute for a good social network of positive-energy people to engage you in stimulating conversation and remind you what day of the week it is.
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Caffeine is NOT good for elders due to it can dehydrate them more easily with the fact that they have less muscle mass and the liver is much slower in breaking down the caffeine. Also, two big things I have found out to look out for is, 1) Watch their sodium intake. Too much and especially too little sodium can have SERIOUS consequences. Too little can put them in a drunken state then into hallucinations and can then lead to death (hyponatremia). I haven't looked up what hypernatremia can do with too much sodium can do. Same with potassium. 2) My Mom has the problem and refuses to change her habit of wiping after urination forward instead of front-to-back so it doesn't cause a urinary infection. Urinary infections can be deadly for elder women and some men, mostly women. Google it and see what some articles say about these two things in elders. I'm 58 and actually went through a BAD bout of hyponatremia and had no idea how out on planet pluto I was. So it can happen at any age, however, elders aren't as much aware of their bodies as us younger folks.
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I have a strong suspicion that diet does play a part in dementia. My mother consumes pork on a daily basis. She rejects many foods that would actually help her. She will eat a basic meal but she loves junk as well. She has diabetes as well. I also think that taking too many medications long term help to contribute to dementia.
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Yes, I think that is correct. I think diet does have something to do with Alzheimer's but I had an aunt who lived to be 94 and she ate nothing but healthy food all her life. She had Alzheimer's when she was in her early eighties. She never ate sweets, pasta, anything from a can or freezer only fresh vegetables and fruit.
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If it is the same thing I saw it was uIltrasound that they are researching for use in plaque buildup that causes Alzheimer's disease and for some brain cancers. Google "Ultrasound and Alzheimer's"
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I saw on TV last week about a new process they think that might help with dementia. They put it this way, you know how plaque on our teeth builds up and needs to be scraped off? Well, that is the same for the brain. It's like a plaque builds up in the brain and they need to loosen that plaque in order for the brain to function properly. I am sorry I do not have any more information, it was in passing that I saw that small portion of the news. Maybe someone can look it up and see how they plan on shaking up the brain to help with dementia.
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Oh and one more thing...pesticides are now being sited as a contributing factor to the development of AZ and a life long habit of getting insufficient sleep is a contributing factor. My father used to spray our lawn with that horrible Round Up pesticide stuff every chance he got. That stuff can build up on our bodies and move past the brain barrier and get into our brains. I'm going to be 60 soon, so the parents of my generation were also using DDT, which is a well known Carcinogen. It is now banned in the US, but we are still using other forms of pesticides in this country which have a cumulative deleterious effect on our health and well being. So when buying produce, go to EWG and get a list of the Dirty Dozen and the Clean list to see what to buy when going to the grocery store. Try to buy Organic whenever feasible and possible. Try shopping for produce at local farmer's markets during the Spring and summer months. They are cheaper than the supermarkets. Change over your personal products to natural ones.
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I agree with YougirlCindy's comments. My father has mid-stage Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease and he has heart disease as well which, from what I understand is common. Usually a person who has AZ also has some other kind of contributing health issue. Scientific studies are now showing a correlation between heart disease and dementia going hand in hand...and what is the life long habit that is creating plaque in the heart and the brain....but sugar. My father has a huge sweet tooth. He is almost like an addict with it. He has it every single day of his life and whenever I confront him on the phone about his sweet tooth habit, he tells me that he is cutting down, but in the meantime, my sister tells me (Dad lives with her) that whenever she goes into his bedroom, she sees candy bars stashed in his drawers. Sugar is implicated in Cancer as well. I'm looking at Cancer alternative protocols and all of the doctors who are being interviewed said that Oncologists have always known that sugar feeds cancer. So whether or not we are talking about preventing or reducing the symptom otology of AZ, Cancer, Heart Disease, helping our loved ones to wean them off of sugar will only help them...and for us as well. My father was also in the habit of feeding himself highly fatty and processed meats throughout his life...all of those breakfast sausages, scrapple and bacon, hot dogs for lunch...OMG!!! It's no wonder that his body rebelled and caused all of the disease processes that he now has. As our parent's adult children, we need to take heed and to take care that we are eating food in their unprocessed form...if we need to eat meat...make sure it is grass fed (not grain fed), antibiotic free, eat whole grains, beans, fresh fruit, vegetables and leafy greens, wild caught fish (not from the Pacific waters where the Fukishima spill is spreading to). My father has also taken a ton of pharmaceutical over the counter and doctor prescribed pills over the years...I'm sure that taking all of these meds has impacted his various conditions as well. Bottom line is that we have to treat our bodies, spirits and minds with respect. It can't always be a party for our mouth. We have to all, me included...I need to be more consistent in heeding this advice, too...to live and eat for health and not to always satisfy my cravings and my taste buds.

I love reading these posts and I love the advice that is being given here. I am so grateful that this online support group exists. Love and hugs,
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You might also want to look up the difference between the two vitamins, i.e., D2/D3...Mayo Clinic was a good source.
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With my mother, diet did make a difference for fourteen months. I noted that as long as her sugar was below 200 on a regular basis, she was 'fine'.

When I got there, I changed her diet to lean meats, fish, vegetables. There is a website DaVita that is helpful with regard to kidney, heart, diabetic diets. I used this as a guide she had thirty percent kidney function (which I found out was normal in the elderly) along with Type II Diabetes and heart problems. Her A1C levels when from around 10 to 7, her kidney function improved a few percentage points, and her blood pressure went down significantly.

So, along with the meds, the diet helped. I'd make things like cauliflower mashed potatoes (i.e., no potatoes, just frozen cauliflower mashed and it was actually not bad)....stuff like that. Squash soup, etc. Her potassium had to be limited, so I would leach out anything with potassium. That website will give you some helpful hints as to what to do. Chicken with vegetables, oatmeal with a small amount of different fruits, etc. The creamer I used was basically colored water. She was allowed 'sugar-free' jello with cool whip, stuff like that, but on a limited basis , as a treat. Also, juice in the morning was Trop 50 mixed with water and sugar free cranberry drink. For afternoon lunches, the drink would be that flavor additive mixed with soda water to give the affect of soda. She liked it.

She had coffee (one or two per day) and that didn't seem to affect her. It was only when she ate at Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc., that I would notice the dementia would get worse. Once those holidays were over, it took about a week to get her back to 'normal'.

At some point, nothing will help. I, too, moved her from MA to FL. That didn't seem to bother her. She was here for seven months with seemingly no trouble. I have to add she was aged 89-91 when this happened. Her diet was not the best as people this age tended to eat lots of fat throughout their lives.

Do some homework to see what foods have what in them, etc., etc. She was on D3 through the doctor, along with heart medications, insulin, etc.
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Interesting about the cholesterol thing. I know mine is high, but have shied away from starting on anything. DH just changes his diet and he goes down 40pts.
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Moms neurolgist explained to her that she would see people who were not there and hear people who were not there. He told her not to worry about it. She also has night terrors occasionally. Was told this could increase and he could medicate for that.
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I think diet always plays a big part. It is one piece that has been put to the side for a long time, probably to not point out the harmful ingredients in our food. It has been proven that certain foods can cause plenty of other diseases, so why not Alzheimer's? We need to all be careful with what we eat. A little cheat is fine once in a while, but not all the time.
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With my latest diagnosis of Vitamin D deficiency, I can tell you it has more to do with the calcium - vitamin relationship than dementia. Of course having a healthy health regime is a good idea, and I do, however, I have osteoporosis and that's genetic. It is always good to check for Vitamin B-12 deficiency as there is also a dementia-like symptom that develops. With AZ and its sun, I am in the sun every day, but still am deficient. I am now taking 50,000 iu's per prescription to get it back up to normal, but my bones have a mind of their own. Best of health to you all!
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My Mom ate very well ,maintained her BMI and exercised like crazy. She could walk 5 miles in a snap in her 70's. She would never take meds for anything. Tried to be as natural as possible until she developed hypertension and started on meds in her mid 70's. When she was 82 I started seeing changes. So today at 87 she is in her home with 24/7 care. I took all caffiene out of her diet and she gets some sun exposure with exercise (walking) several times a week. I believe some of her agitation and seeing things comes mostly in the winter months because of reduced sun exposure/light. Who knows-it is truly a crap shoot. The older we get the more everything just wears out. Who said the brain doesn't age just like our skin, hair ,bones???? Good luck to everyone dealing with this . Prayers help too.
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I think that a damaged brain is more susceptible to food additives than a normal brain. Also, I wonder about the interaction of medications with food additives. My thought is that you should feed a dementia patient the same foods your mother would feed a young child. With enough vegetables and mild fruits like apples, you don't need vitamins. Several years ago I cut processed foods, onions, garlic and strong spices from my husband's diet (and unfortunately, my diet). I cook vegetables in coconut oil and give him salmon every day. He loves pot roast with potatoes and carrots. I do not give him citrus, which I believe causes namenda to remain in his system. I have to say that I feel much better also. He hasn't had a hallucination for about a year and he no longer has anxiety attacks.
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Actually there IS a whole slew of information to be found on this, and diet DOES certainly play a role....for everyone; not just those with dementia. First thing I would do is switch from a 'man-made' Vitamin D to foods that are high in vit. D, and let her get about 20-25 minutes of good morning sunshine directly on her belly! (no more than this is needed per day) Next question.....is she on any statins for "high" cholesterol? Statins are known to contribute to dementia and alz. as well as heart issues. (I believe Crestor may be the worst, and yet every day our TV tells us that we are just not one of the 'cool kids' if we are not in the Crestor club! Argh!) Coconut oil can be added safely and will contribute to good health in LOTS of ways.....so, everything to gain there and nothing to lose. Also, I would start adding in a dose of fermented cod liver oil daily (google it; you are looking for Green Pastures Blue Ice brand) Even better if you can get the one that has butter oil in it. Try to stay off processed foods as much as possible, buy organic when you can, and try to find a source for grass-fed, pasture raised meat. (no hormones, no antibiotics, no gmo-corn feed) Truth is, our bodies just do not know what to do with all the chemicals we put in through our processed food, body care products, prescriptions, etc. On a cellular level, it's like a slow, life-long poisoning of ourselves. I mention all of these things.....not just for your mother, but for you and your whole family. It WILL make a difference! Best to you!
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I think there is definitely a connection between the food we eat and the amount of toxicity in our brains but my mum's dementia is the outcome of two strokes and not a poor diet in her earlier life. I am sure that with rationing during the second world war and until 1954, she did not overdose on sugar, she has never been overweight and in her case the onset of her dementia was not food-related. Now, in the advanced stages I don't even bother what I give her as most of the time she rejects food so I give her anything she will eat. What I did do, however, a couple of years ago, was to change her tea to decaf on the advice of a dementia specialist who told me that research had shown that sundowning happened in relation to a build up of caffeine during the day (among other things) - I do see an improvement and I try to give her fruit juice as much as possible, I would never consider giving coffee whether decaf or otherwise - apart from other things it stains the teeth and with drugs and an aversion to allowing her carers to clean her teeth it's important not to discolour them any more than is necessary.
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My Mom is 78 and has some memory issues but she had 2 Aunts with it and her Mom had Parkinson's. Both are suppose to have some of the same chemicals in the brain. I believe there is a gene factor But read recently about a promising procedure for AZ and it was on the idea of laser the head with a type of sonic laser that breaks up the plaque. I think just a hunch that the plaque is formed from out environment. As there is a lot more health issues today then ever before. Some they put stupid names on and add medication they know nothing about. The money on medication should be used to clean up our environment, but doubt that would ever happen.....
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