Can diet play a part in dementia/hallucinations?

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have read it could be Vit D deficiency and the elderly need more Vit D?

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I think TV contributes to Alzheimers.
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Salt is another factor. Refined salt is a bad thing, and will jack-up blood pressure, for instance.
Good quality sea salt is a big step better, but it can still be a problem for many.
Himalayan pink salt, though seems to be different: it does not usually raise blood pressure up at all--it seems instead to better regulate BP. Of course, that must include other healthy choices and habits.
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It's not just the nutrients necessary [and there are far more than gov't agencies admit to; their MDR's only list a fraction of what we really need].
We require the right things to help enzyme processes break down and transport nutrients to where they should be.
For instance, one can take plenty of D3 to get the levels up, and that does some good, BUT...to get that D3 to help move minerals to the bones, instead of making plaque arteries, or moving plaques out of the arteries, it requires consuming plenty of K2 complex, and/or Natto. Most people who are deficient in D, it's related to the hormone interrupting chemicals in our environments blocking ability to use it--vit. D is a hormone, more than a nutrient---hoards of chemicals we live with are hormone interruptors...of ALL our hormones from doing their jobs---insulin and thyroid included.
Natto [Nattokinase is the capsule] does a nice job of clearing plaqued arteries, but does even better in conjunction with D3, and better yet, if you eat enough actual vegetables it comes from.
Digestive enzymes become increasingly deficient with age, which leads to more ills, since foods cannot be properly digested. Taking antacids calms symptoms for a bit, but impairs digestion more, and impairs nutrient absorption.. Taking digestive enzymes actually helps digest the food and helps access the nutrients in the foods, so we then stop craving too many calories, and our bodies can lose excess fat more easily, as well as accomplish loads of other body chemistries better.
Sugar, and foods that quickly turn into sugar [like flour and potatoes], are inflammatory. Inflammation feeds Alzheimer's plaque-building, as well as every other disease-process.
Cutting out sugars, and cutting out grains if you have to, means the body can relax some, and process things better, because it has less garbage to deal with, and is not then making certain chemicals to cope with the inflammation response triggered by sugars.
Amazing healing and relief can be had, just by removing sugars and grains. Then, adding pertinent nutrients and/or digestive enzymes, can be of great help. Digestive enzymes, for some, are a great 1-step help. Probiotics bigger variety and counts, are another singular great help for most, if one can only afford to do one thing.
But at some point, if Alz. has already done the damages, not much we know how to do, can help more. More time is needed, more approaches needed, and they don't always have that.
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There is a strong link between a diet high in carbohydrates (meaning sugars and starches) and brain disorders, to include mood and dementia. The brain is approximately 60% fat, and it needs natural dietary fat (not man-made fat, like trans fats and margarine)) to be healthy. The emphasis on a low-fat, high carb diet has done enormous harm on Americans' brain health, as well as overall health.
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Capt your shrooms will be popping up soon. Do you mail order?
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if shrooms or lsd tabs are part of your diet trippin id a guarantee..
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The oldest People on record Who lived in Ireland came from the Castlecove, Derrynane regions of South County Kerry. Experts believe this is due to the way that They lived. Plenty exercise, through walking long distances, and hard physical work, also They were terrific dancers. Their diet of plenty fish, and home cured bacon, with lots of vegetables from Their kitchen garden, plus Their own eggs too. They were a very thrifty generation, self sufficient, and They knew how to live. My Generation could learn an awful lot from Them.
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From "Facing Alzheimer’s with Strength and Grace
A GUIDE FOR FAMILY CAREGIVERS

Top 7 Alzheimer’s Myths:
1. Alzheimer’s and dementia are the same thing Dementia is the overarching term used to describe conditions that cause cognitive difficulties. Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia.
2. Memory loss is a normal part of aging occasional slips may become more common with age, but the severe memory loss associated with Alzheimer’s is not normal.
3. Alzheimer’s is preventable with diet and exercise healthy lifestyle habits are important for successful aging, but nothing has been shown to successfully prevent Alzheimer’s.
4. Alzheimer’s only affects old people approximately five million Americans have Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (EOAD), which can occur in people in their 30s, 40s and 50s.
5. There’s an “Alzheimer’s gene” The APOE4 gene may increase EOAD risk, but it doesn’t guarantee a person will develop the disease.
6. Coconut oil can cure Alzheimer’s individual reports of the benefits of coconut oil for people with Alzheimer’s exist, however, there is currently no cure for the disease.
7. Brain puzzles can slow down Alzheimer’s puzzles may help keep a person’s mind active, but they can’t effectively prevent or slow down the progression of Alzheimer’s.
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My Mom is 78-years old and has been diagnosed as having moderate dementia. Last year, I was watching this program that had a "Neurologist-Nutritionist" speaking about AZ/Dementia, a few other diseases and food. BAD food: processed and sugar at the top and then he named off good foods we should add to our diet: darker greens, avocado, certain nuts, coconut oil, omega-3 (salmon), etc (I did not list everything- just tried to do a recall). Well since that time, I have added more of GOOD items to our diet and I don't know if it has made a difference with my Mom and her dementia but I will say it has made a difference with our bowel movements. I have wondered if our way of thinking has something to do with the dementia because my MOM speaks "negative" ALL THE TIME and this isn't new, I've known her to be like this as far back as I can remember and that has me saying "hmmmm, is this possibly a factor?!" I honestly thought one moment she was possessed!
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My mother salted her food too much.
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