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dmanbro, today I was just wondering if bank accounts were still frozen after a person had passed. You answered my question.

I had several joint accounts with my Dad [his SS#] so that I could write checks on his behalf when bills came in. When my Dad passed, the account wasn't frozen because it was a joint account or an "or account". Could be State banking laws are different in my State. I know I was still receiving notifications of interest earned for my Dad's income tax.

I also had to take an account that was just in my Dad's name only and change it over to an Estate account.  That account never was frozen, again probably my State banking laws.

Then I had to wait for Probate to connect the dots before everything was paid and signed off. Whew, what a process !!
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Reply to freqflyer
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I just experienced a similar situation this week. My late mother added me to her checking account several years ago. After she passed SS notified the bank and the account was locked...which means NO ONE could access the funds, not even me. I had to present a death certificate (original, not a copy) and change the account to my name only. In my state (NJ) after I am officially named executor I have to open an estate account, where I can pay bills and deposit checks written to her.
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lyndfos: Is your sibling named on the account? Is your sibling the executor? Sister 1 and I were both on Mom's accounts so after her death so we had full access to her funds.
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Tothill: POD means Pay on Death. An owner of a financial account can name a beneficiary for that account by attaching a POD with the financial institution.

There's no hassle with probate or a will, and the POD is activated immediately regardless of what's written in the will. Example: The will states "I bequeath all moneys to my daughter and my son", but there's an account with a POD of a cousin. The cousin receives his money from that account, and other moneys owned by the deceased goes to the daughter and son.

The person named in the POD only needs to produce a death certificate of the owner and ID for him/herself, and the money is the beneficiary's. The beneficiary can withdraw funds.

I have POD on all my accounts.
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The Executor of an estate can withdraw funds after probate to pay bills and disperse funds according to the will.

POA ends at death. I am not sure what POD refers to.

If the bank account was a joint account with the child, the funds in it are not part of the Estate. The funds will belong to the person named jointly on the account.
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