How much artificial sweetener is too much for a diabetic?

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I'm a caregiver to my live-in partner. He had a stroke, is diabetic that is controlled by medication and diet. He will not drink or eat his foods that need sweetener unless I add 3 to 4 packets. He use to only ask for 1 but now is up to 3 and sometimes demands 4 in his coffee and oatmeal. This seems like too much artificial sweetener. Any advice on side effects since he already had a stroke a year ago.

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My late mother NEVER used artificial sweeteners because she claimed they were cancer causing agents. I don't care for Stevia for its plant-like taste, which it is. Could or would this individual like raw sugar?
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It is also good to remember that xilitol is deadly to dogs. Lots of us have a 4 legged child running around, also.
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I am concerned and disappointed that the "expert" advice did not even MENTION Glycemic Index. In my experience with weight loss 3+ years ago, the kinds of food I ate (including foods I added to my diet, as well as ones I cut down on or eliminated) were at least as important, I believe, than simply limiting carbs & portion control. My goal was to avoid diabetes. I learned that the only way to avoid bingeing on sweets was to avoid extremely low blood sugar and very high. The best way, and this is the current science, to maintain even levels of blood sugar is to go beyond the carbs= bad thinking. Most- not all- complex carbs are healthy because they are not refined, and the body gets more nutrients- including fiber, and takes longer to metabolize. This means the body has to work harder to digest it, so it takes longer & prevents the spikes and the dips that refined 'foods' can cause. For years I believed popcorn and rice cakes were 2 of the best carb snacks. Then I read that both are very high on the Glycemic Index. Why? I don't know about popcorn, but one is advised to use oil on it vs. eating it plain- plain, it raises sugar too high. The fat slows this down. As for rice cakes, rice is actually kind of high, so one should limit one's intake. Better to eat barley, quinoa, cracked wheat- even pasta. Then come rice cakes, light as a feather, right? Turns out the kind of starches used to make the popped rice stick together are very high! A half a bagel raises sugar much faster than half an English muffin. I highly recommend "Easy GI DIET," Helen Foster.
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If you want to know the truth about artificial sweeteners, watch the movie ellelenn recommended: "Sweet Misery." Just because the FDA approves something doesn't mean it is fit for human consumption. The government alphabet agencies are notorious for doing what is best for the corporate bottom line, not for us.

Often the very things we crave are the most damaging because we have become addicted to them. We cease to get relief or satisfaction, and thus the craving for more and more, like nicotine or alcohol. It sounds like your partner is addicted not so much to the sweetness, but has developed a dependency on the chemical compounds in artificial sweeteners.

If he is not suffering from dementia perhaps you could reason with him about the damage done by such substances and seek an alternative. I'm not conversant with natural sweeteners that diabetics are able to use, but there must be a wealth of information on the Internet. Long ago they used to tout tupelo honey, but I don't know if that is still considered safe for diabetics.

Regardless of what you use---and this goes for non-diabetics as well---human beings were never meant to consume the amount of sugar that is part of the typical modern diet.
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Wannek: That's because your mom has probably lost the olfactory sense.
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agave is supposed to be natural but I also read where it is higher in sugar content than regular sugar. who knows anymore, but I do know that personally I try not to get anything with artificial sweetner if possible. i try to read all labels, but so many things have so many chemicals, we are better off eating like our early ancestors. meat, real potatoes, real veggies, real fruits and nothing boxed or canned. and drink water.
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Oh, bummer....wasn't sure. Never used it. Just heard about it and that it was supposedly organic and natural. 😊
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Splenda can be really bad for you; I have to watch for it on labels because my digestive tract rejects it. Stevia is the only one I use; agave, btw, is almost pure fructose. Suggestion for a snack (or small meal replacement): Real plain yogurt, full fat, unflavored, swirl a mixture of cinnamon and stevia into it.
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What about agave nectar???
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Be leery of Xylitol - it can cause diarrhea. Read the label. Try to avoid ANY sweetener which is chemical in the process, and it can cause migraines. Yes, I agree that Stevia's somewhat bitter taste alone will turn you off, but I put it in my coffee with French Vanilla International Coffee liquid and it is great!
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