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I have arthritis and the gout can't get out of the tub.

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My mom has a tub in her apartment, which has a Tub cut out, costs about $200 to 400 dollars, the Cut out is just a cut made out of tub with a step of about 3 inches and about 20 inches wide, Dr can prescride and medicare or medicaid can help pay.
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Reply to skyisblue
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I’ve seen tubs that are cut off to create step-in. It should cost around $700.
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Reply to jo2aqu
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I had a walk-in shower (fit in regular bathtub space) installed for my Mom. I bought the unit at Lowe's for $1100.00 and the contractor $800.00 for installation. It was good when she had to have assistance bathing.Last year I had a Kohler walk-in bathtub with 10 hydrotherapy jets installed. Quick fill and drain. Total cost for the tub and installation was $10,400.00. I like it since I have rheumatoid arthritis. I am completely independent. It might be a little crowded if either of us had to have assistance. We have a separate walk-in shower with multiple shower heads and a built in bench which has plenty of room if assistance is needed. Also plenty of grab bars for safety.
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Reply to anonymous439773
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Jeannegibbs - my mother had a shower/bath chair for that very reason.
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Reply to AnonymousMember
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A major benefit of walk-in tubs is having the seat at ADA height. It is like sitting on a chair. Just cutting in a door does not achieve this. My husband could get up from a chair. He could not get up from sitting flat on the floor with his legs straight out (as you are in a regular tub.)

You need to increase the size of your pipes to and from the tub, to speed up filling and draining.

Air jets are much easier to keep clean than water jets.
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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A solution to the walk-in tub if money is a problem is a cut-down in the side of your existing tub. If your elder is still showering or being showered at home, and soaking in a tub full of water isn't really necessary or wanted, this could help. Call a local remodeling company that handles bathroom remodels and ask if they do it. We had one company in the area that specializes in tub installs and cut-downs.
New walk-in tub + costs associated with bathroom remodel to fit it: $4000+
Cut down in side of the tub: $800.
Huge difference!

They come into the home to do the work, cut down the side of the tub, finish off the opening in the side of the tub with a finished surface that is painted a slightly different color than the tub (so ivory instead of white, etc) - because they understand that elders have a problem with depth perception - so the slightly different color gives them some help with that - and the surface is painted with paint mixed with sand to help prevent slipping. The opening is 4" from the floor, so it's a very small threshold to step over into the tub. You can have it left as just an open cut-down, or have it fitted with a door (which costs a bit more) - in that way, you could still use it as a tub if you wanted.
I left ours open, though I do wish I'd put a door in it now that Mom is gone, because I'd have liked to use the tub sometimes.
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Reply to AnonymousMember
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DW love our step in tub. She is still able to stoop or squat down and soak up to to her chin. This may change as she gets worse but for now it can be great.
I like it also but I don't use because I fear she will need something while I am in it. I liked the fact that I can sit and wash my legs and get off of my feet, then there is the water jets to massage feet and legs when it gets up to the seat level.
Ours has a hand held shower that I use to rinse off while it drains.
It was expensive but felt it was worth it after DW had a slip in the shower. Shop around first, ask lots of questions before buying.
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Reply to OldSailor
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I work in a physical therapy facility and have heard many patients discuss their walk-in bathtubs. The most common problem is cost and limited warranty, but there are some other problems to consider. They can take a long time to fill and drain. This can be a problem when you are done - many people said they get very cold waiting for the water to drain. Most said they wished they had purchased tubs with heated surfaces or had a heat/sun lamp installed overhead. There is often a problem with leakage after these are in use for a while, and getting service can be tough. It is important to shop around, not only for the tub but for the service that follows.
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Reply to fozwort
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Just remember that you cannot fill or get out of the tub unless the door is closed. So essentially you wait inside for filling and draining
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Reply to MACinCT
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The walk-in tub is characterized by a door with a low step-in entrance sometimes as low as 2 inches from the bathroom floor, a comfortable anti-slip surface, therapeutic features that treat and alleviate many physical illnesses and ailments, and many personalized designs to choose from.
The walk-in tub eliminates the need for a guardian, personalizes the positions of grab bars, eliminates the possibility of slip-fall accidents with its anti-slip floor, and includes emergency switches to ensure the user's safety. These safety precautions make the walk-in tub the obvious choice for seniors in need for a home addition that improves their overall quality of life.
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Reply to Ramsharef
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There are certain environmental problems that add to the risk of falling on the floor while walking for bath and if a citizen get fall down, then it is very difficult to handle the situation because at that movement no one would be there to support them. Because of these problems one of my sister bought walk in tubs for her Grandmother from online store
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Reply to PatriciaJohnson
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I think walk in bathtub is the best possible option for elders and physically challenged people. These tubs reduce aches and pains as well as provide you with luxurious and independent bathing. Walk in bath tubs are trending everywhere because of its features which are not available in traditional bathtubs. These tubs has are available with doors that open to the inside and doors that open to the outside. The problem of lifting your legs and entering the bathtub is eliminated by using walk in bathtubs. These bath tubs also have a built in chair that allows you to sit comfortably inside the tub. With such extraordinary features it has hydro jets installed, which helps poor circulation, joint pain, muscle stiffness and many more.
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Reply to RobertBowers
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A walk-in bathtub is a great choice for seniors with mobility problems who have difficulty getting in and out of a traditional tub. The senior citizen with restricted flexibility has more chances of slipping and falling in the bathroom. The greatest option for them is using a walk in bathtub. Walk-in bathtubs are available through online websites, and if you live in a large city, then there are many large companies for walk in tubs like Home at Ease, Hydro System and so on. For the senior citizen, providing them with a walk-in tub will assist them to live a more independent life and also able to enjoy.
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Reply to DonaldClark
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I just checked to see if there is any Medicare or veteran assistance for walk-in showers or tubs. There is in a very few cases where they are prescribed by a doctor and deemed a medical necessity. Normally they do not fall under durable medical equipment, so are not covered by any government service. You can try, but don't be disappointed if your appeal is rejected.
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Reply to JessieBelle
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The walk-in tubs we see advertised on TV are pure piracy. They try to market them to seniors by saying they're only $150 a month for 150 months (I believe). If you do the math, that turns into $22,500 for a bathtub. Ouch! It sounds predatory to me. If someone didn't live 10 years, collection would probably be vigorous, with the balance passing to heirs in a lump payment. I doubt seriously if there would be any help for them, because of their asking price.

If a transfer bench is not good, you might want to visit your local bath improvement store to see what is available that is more in your price range. For most mobility-impaired seniors, a walk-in shower is an affordable option. With installation, you could probably get one for $2000-3000. My parents paid around $1800 for theirs, but it was a few years ago in Alabama. The downside is that you can't soak. The upside is that the price doesn't soak you. With a good shower massage and a shower chair, they aren't too bad. (But I do so miss taking a bath! I hate showers.)
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Reply to JessieBelle
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Sounds like we have the same problem. I love taking a bath but have had to resort to showers only because of not being able to get out of a tub. I've had both knees replaced and the muscle is no longer there to help myself up. That's usually the problem, not being able to push yourself up to a standing position. Instead of going to the expense of a walk-in tub, why not just put handicap bar(s) by the tub for pulling oneself up and using a stool to sit on that rotates around. A plastic chair would also be great to have if it is small enough to fit in the tub. Usually a chair is higher than a stool so you may be sitting on top of the water instead of in the water. Either way, there are options to use instead of changing completely and putting in a walk in tub. Cloudbank sounds like she know what she's talking about and is giving you good advice about the bench. Good luck in getting help for your problem.
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Reply to Terry512
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I am not sure about funding sources.

If the tub must stay, there are some shower chairs that actually go over the tub and are spring loaded so they will shift you into the tube area and out of the tub area when needed. all you do is sit and trigger the device. Less fancy ones (cheaper versions) are a bench that spans the tub and comes into the room. You must slide across the bench but better than trying to step in or out.

If you can afford to make the conversion - DO IT! we pulled out the tub and had a roll in shower installed and have a portable seat. Plus lots of pull bars....WOW it sure makes it safe and easier for Mom. Her aid that does the showers thinks it is great. (I prefer to take showers their too since my mobility is poor myself) Cost was about 5K but worth every penny.

Best wishes ....
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Reply to glasshalffull
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