Follow
Share

If you use a toilet safety product at home (raised toilet seat, toilet safety frame, commode over a toilet), what do you do when visiting family and friends, in a public restroom, or when traveling? Unfortunately, none of these products are portable and discreet, so you can't take them with you. Risk a fall? Stay home? Rely on a diaper? Appreciate feedback.

This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.
Thank you for your response. My story actually goes back 10 years where my Mom's loss of strength in her limbs (muscle deterioration called Myopathy) required her to use a rollator and commode over toilet. Because she needs something close to her body when sitting and lifting (like rising from her rollator), the grab bars in handicap toilets would not work, in fact, they posed more of a hazard due to the placement and could cause a fall, rather than prevent. In addition, the seat was still too low for her (often the case for people using a raised toilet seat at home). She would never allow herself to relieve herself in a diaper (though she does wear as added protection). Her method was to stop eating or drinking on Friday, if planning to go out on Saturday. For obvious reasons, that was really bad.

Because there was so much embarrassment, fear and frustration associated with this, it began to have a negative impact on her quality of life (she was a socially active 70 year old, other than this toilet issue). I searched high and low for a product that was portable and discreet and would allow her to use a toilet in ANY restroom - at home, in the homes of others, in public restrooms, and when traveling. There wasn't for many years, but there is now! More on that later :)
(1)
Report

This is something I deal with too, on the occasion that I take my mom to a Dr appointment and/or to visit family. Doesn't happen very often, as it's easier to just stay home so she can use her bedside commode. Not the way I want it to be, but sure beats the added stress for my mom and me about bathroom issues. She also uses an incontinence pad in her underwear for added protection.
(1)
Report

Not only are the toilets often too low and misplaced hand rails. But my biggest grip is the positioning of the toilet paper. I , for one , can rarely reach it.
(4)
Report

I know what you mean.. The handicapped toilets are too low and usually only have bar on one side.
(1)
Report

This discussion has been closed for comment. Start a New Discussion.