Of all the dementia symptoms I've read here, I've read nothing of one's LO not remembering them. That's always been my fear for my Mom. - AgingCare.com

Of all the dementia symptoms I've read here, I've read nothing of one's LO not remembering them. That's always been my fear for my Mom.

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Mama is 87 and doesn't remember much from years ago and is worse with things that happened recently, even yesterday. And even though she may not remember peoples' names, she does remember them. I have no more fear of her ever forgetting who I am now that she has lived with me for all the years of her aging. She remembers to take care of her cats, dog, birds and turtle though it gets harder for her to get around every day. She is a very routine person so her days do not vary much at all. Everything done at a specific time of day. I never had children to raise and never needed to be so scheduled or routine. My days happen as they happen. Now of course, mostly in caring for her and my disabled hubby. Just wanted to know if anyone has had the experience of one of their parents forgetting them or other family members. I would still care for my mom if she didn't know me but I don't think it will happen. Especially after reading all the experiences of caregivers on this forum and not hearing that happening in their cases.

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Carol, between reading your profile and your current question, it seems that your doctor (s) don't do much in the way of patient education. You might want to consider discussing that with them, reading up on the conditions that affect you and your family on WebMd, or Mayo clinic websites, and reading about dementia on this site. Welcome!
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I thank you so much for your reply and information. I had no idea there were different types of dementia only degrees. Mama hasn't been technically diagnosed with it. Her doctor just said that it is a type of aging forgetting and she may start forgetting more with time. A lot of it is really not being involved with the outside world much (except for TV), due to her immobility and falling. No personal experiences other than our small family here at home. My family is all gone and my husband's are dropping like flies. Oops not very nice, sorry. I am going to start taking Mama back to church so she can have some other interaction. She does love her Lord so and watches church on TV. Thank you for the info on dementia since I didn't get any from her doctor.
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CaringCarol, it does happen. And it does come up on these boards. But it certainly does not happen in very type of dementia. (There are more than 50 types.)

There really is no point in being afraid of this. What will be, will be. It will be time enough to be bummed about it IF it happens.

My husband knew everybody in his life right up to the end. That is typical with Lewy Body Dementia.

My aunt, 100, with dementia, still recognizes me, even though I seldom see her.

My mother, 95, with dementia, recognizes all the family members who come often to visit. She recognizes the less frequent visitors when they tell her who they are. This week a grandson visited whom she hasn't seen for a long time. She did not recognize him at all, but he reminded her about how they always played cards and some other things and she ended up enjoying his visit. She was pleased that such a nice man had been a part of her life, and that he remembered her even if she didn't remember him.

As far as I know, there is nothing you can do to stop this trait from developing if it a part of a person's dementia. From what you write, I'd be surprised if you mother every forgets who you are. But it is not impossible.
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