Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
My mother is 86 and in great health. She has to have her right knee replaced. She is in extreme pain because she is bone on bone. It kills me to see her suffer so. The surgery will help her be out of pain at least after the healing process. Her quality of life will be so much better. If no surgery she would be in a wheelchair within 6 months.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Dear N1K2R3 most anyone would rather "limp a little" than have surgery at age 84. Yes, you are very naïve. People opting for knee replacement surgery have severe pain because with each step, bone is rubbing against bone. They are on heavy pain medication daily which alters their cognition. They are going to physical therapy a few times a week and that is also filled with mind blowing pain. Their knees do not support their weight and they are walking everywhere with canes and walkers. Over a long period of time their wrists become arthritic and their backs become misaligned causing additional pain and problems. You have no idea.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Unfortunately if you have bone on bone, nothing will help. Have you asked your surgeon about Synvisc? It’s a series of 3 injections over weeks that may or may not relieve your symptoms. Your body compensating for your abnormal gait due to knee due to OA is throwing off your hip.
Have you seen an orthopedic surgeon? That is the first step.
If you need a replacement have it done. 
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I am 72 years old and have bone on bone osteoarthritis in my left knee. I can walk about an hour with a little pain and some swelling. I swim and also lift weights. I do have some pain in my right hip from having an altered gait . I am considering knee surgery. Any thoughts on trying physical therapy for correction of walking
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

wleon the older one gets the longer it takes to recover from surgery. I would say up to ayear or more. In the early days everything is totally exhausting and all anyone wants to do is sleep. Just taking a shower will totally exhaust a person.
I had my right hip and knee replaced at age 68 and made a good recovery and was totally active but going to PT wore me out for the rest of the day. Last year ten years lter my left hip broke and I had it replaced. This time I am still weak and tired a whole year later. The hip functions just fine but my general activities are very limited.
i don't think the anesthetic has anything to do with your mother's sleepyness. That should have been gone in a couple of days.
Encourage mom to do her exercises and provide a diet high in protein unless that is otherwise contraindicated. Give her things that are easy to eat. She may not fancy meat and two veg but may tolerate soup, milk puddings, yogurt, cheese in any form and smoothies. if she likes it Ensure is excellent or Boost as that is cheaper. Frequest small meals and snacks is the way to go.
Don't with hold pain meds if she needs them but watch out for constipation.
This is not easy but try not to worry it will only rub off on her and that is the last thing you want. basically let her do things her way. At 90 she has earned that right and pushing her will not effect the final outcome. It sounds as though having the surgery was the right decision so don't start second guessing that part of it whatever happens. just keep loving her and let the lord take charge.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My beloved 90 year old mother has just had a knee replacement. She needed it badly as the pain in her left leg - which she had lived with for a number of years - was just too much to bare. However, after having the operation -which she had recently - she is very very tired, and is falling in and out of sleep. I am worried sick, but the doctor said that this was normal. I am wondering how long does the anesthetic last before it begins to wear out? The doctor told us that her extreme tiredness is because she is coming out of the anesthetic? When will she begin to get her strength back and become more lively?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Why does one elect to have knee replacement? At the end of the day no matter what age you are it's about the quality of life you have on this Earth. We don't live forever, and if we can minimize our pain why not and enjoy the time we have left, without horrible pain. My mom is getting ready to have surgery on her right knee and she is 80 years old., she still has her wits about her she lives alone and she wants to be able to get around she still wants to travel why not? I am in support of knee replacement.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Why knee replacement? At the end of the day it's about the quality of life. We don't live forever. If one has the opportunity to have surgery and minimize their pain why not. My mom is 80 years old and she's getting ready to have knee replacement on her right knee. She still desires to travel to play with the grandkids. Everyone knows that when you're in pain there is little you can do. The best thing one can do is support their family member going through knee replacement so they can recover the best way possible and I pray for anyone going through it or contemplating it. Growing old is no joke. So I'm going to be positive pray to my god Jehovah.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Why does one elect to have knee replacement? At the end of the day no matter what age you are it's about the quality of life you have on this Earth. We don't live forever, and if we can minimize our pain why not and enjoy the time we have left, without horrible pain. My mom is getting ready to have surgery on her right knee and she is 80 years old., she still has her wits about her she lives alone and she wants to be able to get around she still wants to travel why not? I am in support of knee replacement.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I will be eighty years old in April. I have avoided knee replacement for 10 years, and probably would have continued doing so, however; I fell , and my left knee is in bad shape. I can't leave the house; I am having trouble walking with a cane. When I awaken at morn, my knee is so stiff I cannot walk for a few minutes..even with the cane. I will go to my rheumatologist the 14th of this month (March,2017) and ask his opinion on surgery. He had told me, sometime ago, that if I had a stroke, or fell and further injured one of my knees, surgery would be out of the question. Let's see what he says now.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Husband 83 still in pain nearly 2 years after knee surgery. Went to therapy two or three times and then said it hurt too much. Now he can hardly walk. What should he do. He is very perverse.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I am a healthy 78 yr old man leading a comfortable retired life in SW Florida. Except for one thing, my left knee is worn out and gradually getting worse, the pain also. My orthopedic surgeon ( who replaced my right knee 11 yrs ago when I was 67 ) says he's done all he can, my only recourse now is a total knee replacement.
My thoughts though immediately go back to my uncle, who was 82, very healthy but had a noticeable bad limp due to a worn out knee. His 46 yr old daughter finally decides toy get married. My uncle is old-school-tough-Irish,.." I'm walking her down the isle, WITHOUT a limp ! "
Goes to a specialist who tells him he'll do a knee replacement on him, - should not be a big deal. My 82 y.o. uncle went under the anesthetic and never woke up !
So my knee pain, although getting worse, is still not bad enough. Can't help thinking of my uncle,..no way will I undergo that surgery at my age,.. will take pain pills instead. My uncle's doctors assured him like crazy,.." Jack, there'll be no problem, believe me ! " Yeah right ! A knee replacement at age 67 OK ( did have heart problems even so, atrial fib that I am still living with ), but at 78 ?? NO WAY !!!.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

That is such wonderful news! Thanks for the update...keep'em coming.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I want to keep updating my post as I know when I was researching before my Dad had his operation, there was a lot of negative and frightening posts I had read... and not many encouraging posts for the person going in for the operation or their families and what to expect.
He is looking at coming out Monday, pain medication has been changed and he is now totally lucid and with it. He still has pain that is manageable (he swears it is no where near as bad as he thought it would be)
He is walking further than he could before the operation and it is only day 10. Yes his bottom is a bit sore laying down all day, its awkward getting in a comfortable position at times but he is already seeing the improvement and the pain is getting less every day.
Hope this helps others x
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

My 83yr young Dad (toughest old boy you will meet :) has been walking on bone to bone for years (watching him really struggle to walk without pain medications for the last year and saying he is ok was wearing thin. He refused to get an Accrod sticker and swore he would never go under the knife.
The pain had got to the point of "has to be done"! he is now in hospital, 4 days post OP......
He is walking the hallway! Physio is painful... he is on heavy painkillers and a bit out of it.... (beaut conversations you have never wanted to hear from your dad and will never repeat!) lol
but when he can walk without the pain that we have seen him in....... nothing would stop you from doing it!
I will let you know how well he is doing... and thank you for everyone that has posted on their family x
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I'm not really seeing our particular situation in this thread. My mom is scheduled for 3D knee replacement next week. She is almost 80. My brothers and I have tried unsuccessfully to talk her out of this surgery. Why? She has no pain. She only has a slight "catch" when she rises from a chair and she admits that after taking a few steps she is fine. She is in excellent health and we feel this surgery is completely unnecessary. She seems to be listening more to her peers who have all had multiple surgeries and frankly admit that they will continue to have more until "everything is replaced". I just can't fathom a doctor performing this surgery when she has had no other conservative treatment. I don't even believe she has had any diagnostic testing (MRI, etc.) done.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This is not an elective surgery!! These older people are in SEVERE pain! Some have difficulty even standing up or sitting down, their overall quality of life as drindled down to near nothing! Those who the motivation to have such a surgery, are frankly ignorant
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My aunt had her knee replaced after age 90 and did fine. Therapy was tough but she was glad she had it done. It was the second time for her to have the same knee replaced. Had it done over 20 years earlier. She felt she had no choice. SIL just had hers done at 71. Said it was a breeze. Couldn't imagine not doing it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Yesterday my Dad, who is 94, had a MRI and x-rays while in the hospital, so age shouldn't be a factor.

What type of hand pain is this elder experiencing? The whole hand? The fingers? I had something called "trigger thumb" where the thumb would lock up painfully but the doctor shows me how to massage the hand to get rid of the pain, and it worked.

Or maybe this is psychological, as some elders with dementia will get fixated on something medical and won't shake it loose, even when the doctor can't find any known reason for the pain, etc. Example, my Dad has the beginnings of dementia and has an arthritic knee... I bet with Dad's next dental appointment he will tell the dentist about his knee.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Jandkplus5 - thank you so much for your input. Finding a doctor to see him is difficult - they don't seem to want to because he is a resident in a nursing home and his age, and his dementia.... its very hard to see him in pain - so its a challenge for sure.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Niki, take your father to an orthopedic doctor to find out the cause of his hand pain. He could have carpal tunnel syndrome, tenosynovitis, or perhaps arthritis; only a doctor can tell, and that should be determined before just administering pain meds as the facility staff if apparently doing.

Even if he can't answer, a doctor can tell by touching, moving, etc., and noting the facial response; x-rays can also be done, which would probably be the first diagnostic step.

Not doing an MRI would I think be more dependent on whether or not there are any artificial metal parts in the body rather than age, but I think it also might depend on a particular doctor.

We've discovered that some doctors, especially the physiatrists we've seen, don't want to go to much effort to diagnose senior orthopedic conditions.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Is there a ban on 84 yr olds getting diagnostic tests such as ct, mri, because of their age? Have family member in long term care but has constant pain in hand which is treated with pain meds, and or brushed off as psychological in origin because of his dementia. I can't get answers.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My father underwent total knee replacement surgery in Mexico, but he was 67 at that moment. Healing time and mood swings were our problem. Since your dad is 84, he may have difficulty doing exercises for his knee.

Do you already have an orthopedic surgeon that will perform the surgery? If non yet, I recommend Dr. Max Greig, he performs top knee surgery in Mexico and he did my father’s surgery. Here’s his profile: http://goo.gl/BlgrQ5

Good luck to you and your father!
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

OK, so I stand corrected. Osteoarthritis is painful, debilitating and inconvenient, but the pain that you both described from bone-on-bone arthritis in the joint is excruciating. Surgery in these cases is recommended. Forgive my insensitivity.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

To N1K2R3 - If you have to ask why a person would want this surgery, clearly you have never experienced the extreme, debilitating pain associated with bone-on-bone arthritis in a joint. It literally takes a person's breath away -- I've heard my father gasp involuntarily at the slightest movement. "Elective"? It's about as elective as an appendectomy.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

To N1K2R3: Arthritis is more than limping a little or a stiff knee. Arthritis is extremely painful and controls your life. At age 44 I prefer to have my knee replaced and live again than sitting alone in pain for the rest of my life. There is no "mind control" and this is not a "knee adversity." Unless you have experienced the pain, you don't have a voice in this conversation.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

My MIL is scheduled to have total knee replacement Nov 20. She is in a lot of pain, slowing down even more and things are getting harder for her to do.
She has bone on bone rubbing, spurs all around the knee and a huge cyst in the back of her knee due to the front knee problems.
She is 78 now, has diabetes, heart issues and recovering from a stroke.
She did well 7 years ago with the first one done.
We are seriously thinking about sending her to a facility after surgery, because she will get skilled nursing care, physical therapy 5 days a week....... and have to
get stronger before she comes home.
MIL needs to be able to walk for her heart health, diabetes and muscle strength...
Best of luck to those who will have parents having surgery too.
frustrated2012
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

be SURE she does all her exercises, dad had both knees replaced and he said that if he hadnt done the excorcises, he would not have healed as fast. yeah, it hurts, but better to hurt a short time than long time
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

My very healthy 80 year old father recently died from having a total knee replacement. Although death within 24 hours is rare, it does happen. An important factor associated with a significantly increased mortality after total knee replacement is an age of more than 70. My family wishes we had known this before supporting my father with his decision to have the surgery.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Thanks for the thoughts. My mom is 84 and about to have a second knee replacement on her right knee. The doctor saw her xray and wondered how is can manage the pain. She is about 4'10 , 106 pounds and her knew is bigger than a soft ball. There is no padding left and there are so many metal and plastic fragments in the tissue -causing swelling and pain, the doctor can't believe she is handling it so well. So it is surgery or shrivel up in a chair or bed and die.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Subscribe to
Our Newsletter