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I need guardianship for mom. How do you start, and is there a way to aid in financing it? Mom has dementia and can't sign POA papers..I need help

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I feel for you. Just in the process myself. I asked around for lawyer recommendations. It is paid from my mother's funds, as I could not afford to do it either otherwise. The state appointed my mother a lawyer. I started with emergency guardianship, so things were in place to take care or decisions and bills (also conservator). There was a short hearing to ok that. I am going to what would have been the final hearing for the permanent (relatively speaking) guardianship, but my mother and her lawyer are contesting it because she wants to go home. I opened a conservator account and transferred all her funds to that account, as recommended, so it was clear where money was and where it was going. Best wishes. Not fun, but has to be done.
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I'd start with a consultation with an attorney who regularly handles those types of cases in your jurisdiction. They can give advice and explain the process and quote fees. I'd consider the consult fee a good investment. The consultation fee varies, but, at least you can limit it to something in your budget. And I'd inquire if you can get your fees reimbursed from your mom's estate. (Sometimes, that 's allowed if you prevail in court and the Ward can afford it.)
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You've really had a rough time lately, haven't you? Unfortunately, I don't think many attorneys would take this on pro bono. But the questions are (a) would your mother understand and agree to this, dementia notwithstanding, and (b) are there any relatives who might challenge your attempt to get guardianship?

If both answers are yes, you might contact the local county court (probate or whatever level guardianship is handled at in other counties) and ask for the forms, procedural guidelines, etc. You might even ask if they can recommend someone who'll either help you pro bono or agree to a payment schedule.

The county bar association might have a list of attorneys who do pro bono work, so contact them as well.
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