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My mother has parkinson's. She had a stroke several months ago. Her tremors are better after the stroke but she does not communicate or can't seem to focus when she looks at you.

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Brock, the stroke could have affected your mother's vision and ability to focus. If the stroke affected her right side, sit on the left or in front of her, she may be able to see you better. Just because your mother isn't able to communicate, she may understand what you are saying. Talk with her therapist, I assume she is getting PT and OT, and get some tips to help with communication. Like other responders have answered, every stroke is different, every patient is different, but the caregivers and therapists should be able to help you.
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Brock1: Bear in mind that you will have to know if it was an ischemic stroke or a hemorrhagic stroke.
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brock1: Look at the Parkinsons website. It will have a wealth of information for you.
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, Brock1, I am so sorry for your having to go through this. A stroke is serious enough, but to couple that with Parkinson's is a double whammy. I've dealt with both. It may be that some of the meds she is on for the stroke are easing her Parkinson's symptoms and visa versa. I found that speaking with my husband's doctors, therapists and case manager was invaluable. No two strokes or Parkinson's symptoms are exactly the same. When my husband first had his stroke, he suffered from Aphasia which affects the ability to put thoughts into words and be understood. For example, he would tell me I washed dishes in the toilet. But when shown flash cards of dogs, he didn't just say "dog", he would also correctly name the breed. If your mom is in a facility, I would call a Care Conference meeting with the staff to discuss what they're seeing. If she isn't, ask her doctor if you can meet with him/her to discuss your mom's prognosis and how you can and should handle her issues now. It's probably just as frustrating for her as it is for you.
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Brock I'm trying to think of something encouraging or reassuring or at least consoling to say. Given that your mother can't communicate with you, does she still seem to be aware that you're there, though? Are you able to gauge whether she is comfortable and content?

The effects of a stroke can vary so enormously that I'm not sure it is helpful to distinguish between Parkinson's and other patients, particularly. At a guess only, it sounds as if the stroke has altered some part of the complex mechanism that causes tremor; and perhaps it would be nice to think that this brings your mother some relief from what was a chronic discomfort for her.

If you have specific questions about what the stroke has altered in your mother's brain, I'd ask her neurologist - only, I wouldn't necessarily expect very clear answers. Brain function is much better understood than it was but even so far more remains to be discovered than is currently known.
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Brock1, I am sorry to hear of your mom's stroke. My dad suffered a severe stroke ten days ago, which affected his vocal chords and he too cannot speak. We also seem to think that his focus is 'out' and he doesn't look at us directly when we speak. He has dementia, so we're not sure if he is with us or not when we talk to him, but sometimes he tries a smile or lifts his head off the pillow. I ask him to hold my hand and he grips it, but I am not sure if it means anything to him. It is so difficult and I often just want to cry. He seems so helpless. With dementia alone, he was more responsive. He is 88 and he is up one day and down the next. I am sorry I cannot be of more help, but I thought by passing this on, you might identify with some issues.
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