Assistive devices missing on the market.

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I would like to ask for opinions and ideas on what devices or tools do you buy for the senior to help support his or her independence at home and what do you think is missing on the market (what would you need but cannot find)? if you know of a challenge that the person you care for faces when performing certain activities at home or outside, what device/tool would help them the best?Thank you in advance for your input!

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Great insights, cwillie, thank you! As some of the biggest issues i heard of putting coat/jacket/sweater on a, which relates to shampooing because of the shoulder pain, as well as getting back up from falls.
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They say that necessity is the mother of all inventions so if you are really interested in inventing a useful device you need to identify a need and then use the internet to search for a solution. There is very little that is not available to be bought somewhere in the world if you have the money to spend. Something that continues to frustrate me is the exorbitant prices charged for anything labelled as an assistive device and the often dubious quality you get for the money. Some things that are hard to find:
*Toilet seat extensions that can be easily removed for cleaning
*modesty aprons/wraps for showering/bathing
*inexpensive devices to help someone who has fallen and can't get up
*bath/shower chairs that have sturdy arms, an adjustable tilt back for shampooing and are actually comfortable to sit on
*
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Thank you so much for such a detailed answer, Veronica!
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FF we do have double hand rails on our outside and basement stairs and they can be a life saver. I have yet to put a hand by the back door into the garage but it is coming. I am not fussy what it looks like.
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Tatiana one of the "Help, I"ve fallen and can't get up" buttons. Actually there are a number of techniques I use. First don't voluntarily get on the ground! I use a gardening stool when gardening. I sit to weed and use the handles then if I need to kneel. I did manage to tip it over and had a bad fall hurting my ribs last week. In which case I have to roll on my belly, get up on one knee, push on that kneel and get upright. If there is something sturdy nearby I will crawl to that. That's fine in the house but not so good in the snow or mud. I do have some boots with spikes on the bottom for the ice but you have to change them when you get in the car to drive. I used to get out of the bath tub by rolling over then doing the kneeling thing but I now just sit on the shower chair and wash and kneel when I wash my hair. I have got stuck in the tub a couple of times because the safety strips in the bottom prevented me from rolling. By the way I always let the water out before attempting anything so I don't slip and drown. I try not to let anyone help me up off the floor because they just pull on my arthritic arms and that hurts. I try not to sit in a chair without arms which can be difficult in restaurants because the table are unstable so I can't pull myself up.
Many people hate to use assistive devices in public high is a pity because if you do people are in the main very helpful. I am often very supised and thankful when someone puts something heavy into my car for me or opens a non automatic door. There really are some good people out there.
My disabilities have come on me suddenly so I am constantly learning new ways of coping. Now if I could just get hubby to push a wheel chair properly. He crashes into everything endangers other peoples ankles and chips chunks out of walls where ever we go. Elevators are the worst as he rushes in before the door closes and people have to jump aside. It's a whole new world out there and there is no manual.
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Thank you freqflyer, great point!
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Veronica, lot of great ideas :)

At one time my Dad was going to put grab handles at the door leading in from the garage.... there was one tall step up to get into the house and Dad would try to grab the frame work around the door. Every now and then Dad would find himself falling backward out the door but the car would catch him. Dad never got around to putting those in because he was spending too much time looking for the perfect grab handle.

If someone has stairs in their house, put another hand rail on the other side if the stairs are narrow enough so that a person can reach out and use both rails. We have that at our office building [built in the 1940's] and it makes it so much easier to run up and down the stairs.

I use to be an ideas person, but the past few years of caregiving, my mind is now like quicksand :P
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Thank you, Veronica for your insights. What do you think of challenges when it comes to kneeling or getting down to the ground floor to pick up something and then getting back up to a standing position. Have you found any useful products for this or is there something missing?
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Simple things go along way. Grab handles by all outside doors. Hand rails in the bath room lots of them. Change out the toilet for a higher one and allow plenty of room around it. If a cane is not enough get a rollator with brakes, cup holders and big bags to carry stuff. Double handled mugs are good and longer flatware with fat handles. A pull up rope attached to the end of the bed to help the patient sit up prior to getting out of bed. Also a rope over the bathtub so someone semi-independent can get themselves standing after a nice long soak. A pick up tool that really picks up and does not drop things, very helpful in the supermarket when using an electric cart. Advocate for more handicapped parking places especially at hospitals. Enforce the rules about non handicapped people using those spots. Seat belts or harnesses on wheelchairs.
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