Follow
Share
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
TO help prevent a fall.............I have a transfer belt for my husband who has FTD (Frontal temporal dementia). I bought it from AMAZON and it has loops on it, is like a belt and goes around the waist. I does help to handle him when walking. Is something to help grab on to him if he falls too. I have found when he is a little unsteady if I hold on to his hands and I walk backwards, he does better. He has a contractured left hand and arm so he can not use a walker. I do try to raise him to a chair like mentioned earlier. Have one available if he wants to sit. Also his male caregiver has put his knee behind him by his rear if he is trying to sit when walking and use his knee as a "chair" for a min. then he gets up and walks again. We have discovered you have to be prepared for anything and be creative. If he falls in a sm room(bathroom) you can get him on a blanket, sheet and pull to another area to get up. This has worked for me. My neighbors will assist to get him up or I would have to call EMS. Be careful of your back.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I used to call the EMTs (the fire department) for my mom but she fell so regularly that I could tell that they were finding it too much. I'd say that she doesn't need the full brigade, she just needs to get up, but that's not how they operate. Her weekly (or more) falls were the deciding factor in her going into the same nursing home where my dad lived.

I jokinging have said that every city needs a person who will simply go and help pick up people who have fallen and can't get up with the help of the caregiver. This really isn't so far fetched but it's unlikely to happen if only for liability reasons.

Good luck with our present problems. It's a big issue for caregivers.
Carol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I call the local fire department.

The come out, check the vital signs and make sure there isn't a medical emergency to deal with, and help put the parent back to bed.

I've only had to do this twice. Once Dad was taken to the hospital just to be sure as he seems like his hip would not work at all.

They have no charge for this service.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Don't get hurt would be my first piece of advice. If dementia isn't horrible would he be able to "help himself" if he had proper assistive devices to grab? Any assistance he can offer in moving himself is better for him and lessens the chance of you and other caregivers getting hurt. Always glad to offer suggestions although in some cases dementia can be so bad any product can be too confusing. Towards the end my father would yell down the hall for help because he couldn't understand the call button clipped to the front of his shirt. Dementia sucks- best wishes to you and your father. .
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Dad starting to "forget?" how to get out of bed. Says "I'm uncoordinated"..He had been rolling to side, put one foot then other on floor,then push up with arms to sit up.. Then rests. Then stands up. Lately starts to roll over from middle of double bed so ;not close enougth to edge of bed to put foot down. Syatyd to put ifrst foot down, but rolls back over the other way. Trying to coach him thru the steps one at a time but doesn't weem to listen or understand. Sib suggest bear hug {?) but home care person told me do not lift or pull in any way. Hope agency caregiver can show us next week. Any ideas?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Will be able to offer a report on the Camel chair soon- one of my customers just purchased one (for the husband with MS) and promised she will get back to me with comments once she has some experience with it. She said it was about $3000 and she got it from the US distributor.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Gosh I am so glad my parents haven't gotten to falling, tbis doesn't sound like any fun at all! I would just call 911 and hope that since we've never called previously, they wouldn't mind coming out.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

BoniChak- did you ever get the Elk/Camel inflatable chair? How did it work out for you? Good point was made for the videos on you-tube- lots of good stuff there because you can usually see demos on mobility/fall issues- even bed mobility.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

FF, your parents can only be in denial as long as you keep showing up. I suggest you take a two week holiday. (You can stay at home. Just the parental that you are not avsilable, doctor's orders). I imagine that they will see their independence is a myth.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

If my sig other is at work and my Dad should fall, I will be calling 911. There is no way that I could safely pick Dad up without causing damage to my own self. I have a limit of 20 pounds, and when a person falls they are dead weight. I just wish my parents weren't in denial about this... [sigh].
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Fedgie, just make sure there are no broken bones before you roll.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

have them roll onto a cushion
then roll from one cushion to two cushions
then from two to three high, etc.
by the time they reach a ten cushion height
they will be standing
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

on you tube you will find videos of CNA training for one person lifting
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

I couldn't (hip replacement and bad back) and unless she could help herself I called EMS. They'll only do it so many times until they bill you big bucks. I couldn't do it, she was mostly in bed (parkinsons, strokes and dementia), I couldn't stay awake 24/7 and she'd allow no-one in then house so after a major fall, blood and poop everywhere, she went to a nursing home where there are skilled staff to care for her and many mechanical options to get her up.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

I recently read a tip elsewhere about preventing someone from rolling out of bed. Buy one of those long skinny round pool floaties, costs a dollar. Put that at the edge of the bed under the bottom sheet. That little bump is supposed to help prevent those rollouts.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

When I lift my 95 pound, 92 yr old mom, and I'm 5'0 and 135 lbs... I have her sit up, and as the other commenter said... I get behind her HOWEVER, I scoot her onto a low stool. Then we move up to a higher stool... and then up to her bed. I'm behind her helping her scoot up every time, she happens to have strong upper body and one strong right leg. Left leg had hip surgery. So, from down, to sitting, to up on a low stool, to a higher one, and finally to bed side. All easy on me.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I bought a "Gait Belt" to give me a place hold on. Goes around waist snaps in place. It is still in box, haven;t needed it yet
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

It's never a good idea to use a piece of non-stationary furniture as leverage in getting someone up off the floor. Climbing up a chair or an ottoman is dangerous as these things can scoot a few inches as the person tries to climb up it or they can fly out from underneath someone altogether.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

{Q}Eventually, they told me that's not what they were there for. Maybe it was just one EMT, but I had to agree that I was using resources we didn't need. I'm thrilled to see that some places have a lift unit because that is a huge need. {EQ}

It is what they are there for!

Have you seen the price of lift units. Very costly.

I have had call for assistance. I probably should have had her taken to emergency for examination of hidden injuries.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Frequent falls led to my mother living in the nursing home. I'd called 9-1-1 so many times but the full force would come even when I said it wasn't needed. Eventually, they told me that's not what they were there for. Maybe it was just one EMT, but I had to agree that I was using resources we didn't need. I'm thrilled to see that some places have a lift unit because that is a huge need.

Mom was in no condition for someone who was untrained to lift her and it was best to have two people. Since my dad was also in the nursing home, this was the trigger for her move to be with him.

This is really a tough situation for a caregiver - when the physical part becomes too much. We're with you.
Carol
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Where we live you can call 911 and ask for the 'Lift Unit" and they will come and lift the person…However, I agree with pamstegman and would advise to call 911 and not try to do any lifting unless you have medical training…My mom has diabetes and doesn't feel pain.. she fell and broke her neck and didn't experience pain!!!
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I googled the Elk and Camel inflatable chairs. They only sell to retail so I gave info to my Local Neighborhood Pharmacist (Who I know QUITE well) lol. He is going to get me more info and a price. It looks perfect for my situation. I will let Y'all know when I do, about cost. btw, its Prism Medical, if you want to see it.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

After an accident as a child I've had a number of surgeries on my left hip. Though that leg will bend it gives way if I put weight on it while it's bent. If I have to get down on the floor for any reason and there's nothing nearby I have a small step stool on hand to climb back up. I use one in the garden as well though I'm putting in some raised garden beds to make it easier.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I am not able to get up onto my knees. Did not learn that in physical therapy after one knee was replaced. What is the best way to get me up if I fall?
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Dave- I mentioned the Camel above as an inflatable "chair" and the ELK is a simpler version made by the same company- inflatable cushion instead of a chair style. They now sell in the mangar.co.uk has videos. Falls will happen but I try to keep people from falling in the first place- way too easy for serious injuries to occur in a crash.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

In the UK they have a product called ELK Cushion for lifting a person from the floor. Is such a product available here in America? Its easy to use. Dave C.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Back to the Camel inflatable chair I saw at the tradeshow- it is rated for up to 705# so it could used for very heavy people. When weights get real high I doubt if any technique is out there for preventing lifting injuries. My focus is mobility issues- feel free to contact me if you want suggestions.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

Has anyone seen a Physical Therapist for strengthening and balance? This can help prevent falls. Ask you loved ones doctor for a Physical Therapy referral.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

I have a different technique for getting them up off the floor (after insuring that they are ok and nothing is broken). I get them to sit on their bum, knees bent and feet on floor. I get behind them and bend down and put my arms under their armpits and then on the count of three I get them to push off with their feet at the same time I am lifting them up. It works for most elderly people that have use of their legs. Good Luck!
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Although my own product is bed mobility related I always love any new product to keep people safe. Just returned from a big tradeshow and saw a product called a "Camel" which is essentially an inflatable chair to pick a person off the floor. It is made by a company in England (mangar.co.uk) but they now have distribution in the US. I understand they are not cheap but lifting injuries are also expensive. If I can offer advice please contact me.
Helpful Answer (0)
Report

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.

Ask a Question

Subscribe to
Our Newsletter