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It would be best to get training. You may want to check with a local ambulance company to see where you can get training in your area. The Alzheimer's Association provides training for caregivers of people with Alzheimer's, but I don't know if they would provide this type of training. You could call them. You also may want to learn CPR.
Carol
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Wow. Your question brings back memories for me. I hope you are asking as a precautionary measure and not because you have had to face the situation. I wouldn't wish the situation on anyone as it can be so unnerving, not to mention sad. Sometimes the best thing one can do for someone who has fallen is to call for EMS support while you just make sure that the person is as comfortable as can be. Some falls will result in added injury to the individual who has fallen if an untrained person attempts the lift. One of the things I have done is to first sit on the floor alongside the person to try to keep us both as calm as possible and to determine whether and how much the person is able to move with, or without pain. That tells me whether to attempt to lift, or call EMS. That may sound like a long time, but it only takes a few seconds to do that first visual assessment. How to lift depends on what parts of the body have been most severely affected by the fall. It also depends on whether the person has any upper body strength, or not. Sometimes I have used a pillow between myself and the person or on the person's back, or under his knees or bottom, to help lessen the impact of lifting and causing more soreness. Beyond those general comments which I use independently, Carol's reply is the best advice, in my opinion. An untrained lift can injure both the caregiver and the person being lifted. It is best to not take chances, even if appears to be a minor tumble. EMS is well trained. It is usually a good sign if the person who has fallen is able to get back up with just a little support from the caregiver, but only doctors are trained to properly evaluate whether there is any non-visible injury or trauma from a fall. If the person has hit his head in the fall, medical follow-up should be prompt as there may be a possibility of a concussion. Also be alert to the person's mental confusion after any fall. May require follow-up medical treatment. Falls can be so complicated, which is why I find them so unnerving.
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Here's a technique I learned from a health tech. If they fell but appear to be able to sit etc., find a sturdy chair, like a dining room chair and place it facing the person. have the person "climb up" into the chair. The chair will support their weight as they slowly get into the chair. Hope I explained that okay.
So, they are on their backs, roll them over, get them to their hands and knees, place hands on chair and slowly help them to sit on the chair.
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when this happens to my mom, after I make sure she isn't injured, I have her roll over onto her knees and then put a stool or chair in front of her and she climbs up onto that. I grasp her under her arm and have her hold onto my upper arm and pull herself up that way
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My mother is partially paralyzed on her Rt. side due to a previous stroke, though she does have some leg strength. Along with the former info. I am thinking perhaps of using a long towel or sheet to hook or wrap under her arms or around her somehow, then pivot/placing our feet, such that I can leverage her upwards.
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Despite every possible safety precautions, Mom's becoming more "tippety" & falls more frequently. We are often home w/ her & able to help when she takes a tumble. But her arthritic knees, wrists & hands,are becoming too weak to allow for the "kneel & climb" techique. Any ideas for another strategy (aside from being lifted off the floor by paramedics)? An instructional video that demonstrates several alternatives would be ideal!
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I too have very bad knees and when I fall I don't even have to power to life myself. I am 53 yoa young! and it is awful! I need to have my right knee replaced. I was very heavy at one time had a gastric bypass in 2002 and lost over 250 lbs. Unfortunately, the damage was already done to my joints. My left knee was replaced in 2008. My right knee is shot. I have fallen 4 times in the past 6 mos. I had to call 911 twice, my daughter lift me up once and my husband tried and he fell in the process and dropped me again! It was awful! Any suggestions for me?
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I am 85 this Tuesday, my wife is 77. She fell out of bed last night around 11 PM. She was finally able to get up using a chair i got her but not until she scooted to the end of the bed where she had room to turn over. She has had surgery on both shoulders which left her unable to be lifted by her arms (torn muscle). A former neighbor was selling a lift for that purpose last year. I wish I had got it. It looked lik something a garage may use to lift an engine from a car.
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My Nana is getting weak. As I am directing her from vehicle to mobile devices. I prompted her to assist me. By placing her arms around my neck. This ensures me of her confidence. The most important thing in which to remember in assisting a elderly person. That may not be thinking at the same rate as yourself. Any rejection of assistance may result in an unpremeditated shift in weight. Think clearly of the task before you.
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Unless you have EMT training and can check for breaks /dislocations, call 911. They can assess and decide whether or not to transport. There is no rush in getting someone up. If they can't move fingers and toes, if there is pain or tingling or confusion or bruising, call 911.
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Although my own product is bed mobility related I always love any new product to keep people safe. Just returned from a big tradeshow and saw a product called a "Camel" which is essentially an inflatable chair to pick a person off the floor. It is made by a company in England (mangar.co.uk) but they now have distribution in the US. I understand they are not cheap but lifting injuries are also expensive. If I can offer advice please contact me.
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I have a different technique for getting them up off the floor (after insuring that they are ok and nothing is broken). I get them to sit on their bum, knees bent and feet on floor. I get behind them and bend down and put my arms under their armpits and then on the count of three I get them to push off with their feet at the same time I am lifting them up. It works for most elderly people that have use of their legs. Good Luck!
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Has anyone seen a Physical Therapist for strengthening and balance? This can help prevent falls. Ask you loved ones doctor for a Physical Therapy referral.
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Back to the Camel inflatable chair I saw at the tradeshow- it is rated for up to 705# so it could used for very heavy people. When weights get real high I doubt if any technique is out there for preventing lifting injuries. My focus is mobility issues- feel free to contact me if you want suggestions.
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In the UK they have a product called ELK Cushion for lifting a person from the floor. Is such a product available here in America? Its easy to use. Dave C.
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Dave- I mentioned the Camel above as an inflatable "chair" and the ELK is a simpler version made by the same company- inflatable cushion instead of a chair style. They now sell in the mangar.co.uk has videos. Falls will happen but I try to keep people from falling in the first place- way too easy for serious injuries to occur in a crash.
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I am not able to get up onto my knees. Did not learn that in physical therapy after one knee was replaced. What is the best way to get me up if I fall?
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After an accident as a child I've had a number of surgeries on my left hip. Though that leg will bend it gives way if I put weight on it while it's bent. If I have to get down on the floor for any reason and there's nothing nearby I have a small step stool on hand to climb back up. I use one in the garden as well though I'm putting in some raised garden beds to make it easier.
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I googled the Elk and Camel inflatable chairs. They only sell to retail so I gave info to my Local Neighborhood Pharmacist (Who I know QUITE well) lol. He is going to get me more info and a price. It looks perfect for my situation. I will let Y'all know when I do, about cost. btw, its Prism Medical, if you want to see it.
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Where we live you can call 911 and ask for the 'Lift Unit" and they will come and lift the person…However, I agree with pamstegman and would advise to call 911 and not try to do any lifting unless you have medical training…My mom has diabetes and doesn't feel pain.. she fell and broke her neck and didn't experience pain!!!
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Frequent falls led to my mother living in the nursing home. I'd called 9-1-1 so many times but the full force would come even when I said it wasn't needed. Eventually, they told me that's not what they were there for. Maybe it was just one EMT, but I had to agree that I was using resources we didn't need. I'm thrilled to see that some places have a lift unit because that is a huge need.

Mom was in no condition for someone who was untrained to lift her and it was best to have two people. Since my dad was also in the nursing home, this was the trigger for her move to be with him.

This is really a tough situation for a caregiver - when the physical part becomes too much. We're with you.
Carol
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{Q}Eventually, they told me that's not what they were there for. Maybe it was just one EMT, but I had to agree that I was using resources we didn't need. I'm thrilled to see that some places have a lift unit because that is a huge need. {EQ}

It is what they are there for!

Have you seen the price of lift units. Very costly.

I have had call for assistance. I probably should have had her taken to emergency for examination of hidden injuries.
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It's never a good idea to use a piece of non-stationary furniture as leverage in getting someone up off the floor. Climbing up a chair or an ottoman is dangerous as these things can scoot a few inches as the person tries to climb up it or they can fly out from underneath someone altogether.
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I bought a "Gait Belt" to give me a place hold on. Goes around waist snaps in place. It is still in box, haven;t needed it yet
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When I lift my 95 pound, 92 yr old mom, and I'm 5'0 and 135 lbs... I have her sit up, and as the other commenter said... I get behind her HOWEVER, I scoot her onto a low stool. Then we move up to a higher stool... and then up to her bed. I'm behind her helping her scoot up every time, she happens to have strong upper body and one strong right leg. Left leg had hip surgery. So, from down, to sitting, to up on a low stool, to a higher one, and finally to bed side. All easy on me.
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I recently read a tip elsewhere about preventing someone from rolling out of bed. Buy one of those long skinny round pool floaties, costs a dollar. Put that at the edge of the bed under the bottom sheet. That little bump is supposed to help prevent those rollouts.
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I couldn't (hip replacement and bad back) and unless she could help herself I called EMS. They'll only do it so many times until they bill you big bucks. I couldn't do it, she was mostly in bed (parkinsons, strokes and dementia), I couldn't stay awake 24/7 and she'd allow no-one in then house so after a major fall, blood and poop everywhere, she went to a nursing home where there are skilled staff to care for her and many mechanical options to get her up.
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on you tube you will find videos of CNA training for one person lifting
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have them roll onto a cushion
then roll from one cushion to two cushions
then from two to three high, etc.
by the time they reach a ten cushion height
they will be standing
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Fedgie, just make sure there are no broken bones before you roll.
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