Follow
Share

Are non-professional non-family caregivers a common thing? My mother, who lives in a senior apartment (in another state from me), has an acquaintance helping her with shopping and driving to doctor appointments. My mom knew this person's now-deceased father but has known her for only a short time. From what I can tell, she has no set rates for services, and is neither bonded nor insured. This person apparently provides such services for several people in the senior complex. Should I be concerned?

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
You don't have to be certified to take someone shopping or to dr. appts. I think its a great way to make extra money. As long as her rate is agreed upon by both parties, no problem. I would only be concerned if she took advantage of LO like asking for a loan.
Helpful Answer (8)
Report

There is someone such as this where my mother is. If I am out of town she is available generally. She has lots of tips regarding doctors etc. I generally take my mother to all appointments but if I really cant this person is generally available and has a very nice disposition.
Helpful Answer (6)
Report

I have such a person, non-family, non-professional helper who drives and takes my mom out couple of times a week. I pay her a reasonabl fee and she is happy. My mother is happy. I am happy to get a break. My children are happy to get a break from crazy grandmother.

I am so glad to have her help.
Helpful Answer (5)
Report

I would be a little worried, but that's just me.
some people aren't so honest. I don't know what you could really do tho.
besides some sort of background check.
I know I have gone to my county courts website and ive looked up arrest records, probate records etc.
you sound concerned since you are here asking...
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

You should be aware...that it is a ripe opportunity for someone to gain access, influence, theft...but it would for a paid caregiver as well--with paid you have some oversight though, someone to hold accountable, someone to at least assure you that a background check has been done and that the past is clear (but no one can predict the future...there's only so much you can do). Sometimes this starts off as sort of a friendship...sort of a "senior helping senior". And make no mistake...it CAN be a very good thing...but be aware even in the best of circumstances it can create some awkwardness...the person MAY expect to be compensated. It is often like work...it IS work. And of course, no, a "friend/acquaintance" would not be bonded or insured. But many seniors are capable and functional; they welcome company, being needed having something to do, and if they can do that while helping someone, so much the better. There is no easy answer to this...Certainly in the best of circumstances one would want to convey their appreciation...a gas card, restaurant gift card...If you are uncomfortable with this (is the person a safe driver??) you might want to contact the local city hall/office on aging/even the building management to get a referral so you can set mom up with rides/transportation. Often you may get resources via the local Area Agency On Aging website.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

May I just add...not to add to the concerns and paranoia...but you can only do so much. For instance, in my role I at time am in a hiring position...I'm the one the applicants have to get past, and my attitude is they better be good enough to take care of my own family...and I mean it. Yes, we check references, for relevant and steady work history, and if offered the job, in our state (OH), a criminal background check is required, both FBI and BCI. So that means there is nothing in their PAST, but it doesn't mean something could not happen in the future. So here I am, also in a caregiving role, and I have often considered having someone in...although my mother would most likely fight us on it...but the thought of someone being in the house unsupervised is unsettling to ME. We're so overwhelmed and preoccupied I'm afraid if something were to go missing, would we notice? And sometimes it can be something small that isn't noticed for months. My aunt lives in an assisted living with housekeepers on the staff. When my aunt was in rehab someone (with some suspicion by management/history becoming known) got into her unit and stole some items. So if you have anything of value I'd get a locking box (a big one so it can't be slipped out) and/or give the valuables to another family member.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I hate to be a "wet blanket", but if the woman is paid being, her services might be construed as being "for hire", putting her in a professional driver category. That raises the issue of her liability for accidents, as well as possibly a commercial driver's license.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

If the person had a car accident, the insurance issue might become prickly if he/she hadn't told the insurance company the car is used to make money.

I've though on and off about taking other elders on grocery trips with my mother, and charging them. But the thought of being in an accident while with them makes me shudder!
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

I used 3 such companions. I never had them drive my L.O. anywhere as it wasn't needed. My friends had many that fit this description serve as aides, both live in and occasional. We've not had problems. Possibly VERY lucky but we did have good references on all of them.
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

Thanks for the answer, all. As with a few other posts here, I'm asking primarily to confirm my own thoughts, which run toward being trusting of people. It's my sister who is suspicious of everyone, imagining anyone who helps our mother as someone who will steal her money. She is also insistent on a helper being licensed and, if she talks to mom about medical issues, an expert in medicine. Of course, neither of us as children have such expertise either, and in addition, live far from our mom.

While I have a few concerns, I will likely constrain my actions to monitoring her checking accounts on line and just keeping in touch. I supposedly still have POA but have no documentation for that and will ask her about it.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

See All Answers
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.

Ask a Question

Subscribe to
Our Newsletter