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As the sole provider and supplier for my home, I am not in support of my wife acceptance of POA for her parents. This has and will require a large amount of time and resources extended from my home. The relationship is very strained between myself and my inlaws. Can I legally prevent her from being the agent of the POA. Her father is living on reverse mortgage and credit cards and I am very concerned as my wife is not very legally minded. She refuses to revoke her standing. What can I do? tnx,

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No, you cannot legally prevent your wife to be her parents Power of Attorney. If her parents wants her to be POA, that is the parent's choice as they have confidence in their daughter to do the right thing regarding their care and finances.

What you need to do is step back and let your wife proceed as Power of Attorney. It doesn't matter if her parents have a reverse mortgage and credit card debt, it doesn't come out of your pocket nor your wife's. Her parents are the only one liable for any debts.

As I re-read your post, it sounds like you wouldn't even let your own wife be your Power of Attorney because she's not legally minded. Are you yourself an attorney?
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Or someone who is still living in the 1950's.
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Your wife having a power of attorney has nothing to do with you, and it is not your decision to make. It is literally between her and her parents. The fact that you are willing to take your own wife to court in order to try and prevent her from taking care of her parents is very telling about you, and I honestly can't believe you would be willing to do such a thing (even if you could, which you can't) just because you are upset with your inlaws. It is not about you, and I don't blame her for not giving in to your ridiculous demands. Leave her alone and let her take care of her parents.
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It is up to your wife whether to help her father or not. It will involve your wife's time and her father's resources. You do not need to be involved. What country is your original home? I get the feeling that we are speaking across cultures.
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Your wife having PoA does not mean that she is accepting any financial responsibility for her parent. Make sure that neither of you signs any documents that indicate that you accept financial responsibility for her parent. She should sign as " Jane Doe, in her capacity as PoA for......."

The fact that she is poa does not mean that they move into your home. Your wife can arrane for their care. She can call the local Area Agency on Aging to find out what resources are available.
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I agree with frequflyer. It is certainly not his decision to make, and it does not make the person with the POA responsible for any of their debt.
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No, they are not responsible for the hospital bill. In no state in the union is it even required to write "power of attorney" or "POA" after signing your name. Leave the legal questions for people who actually went to law school. Having a power of attorney has NOTHING TO DO with liability for financial debts, period.
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Truth, I've 9been advised differently. That if I signed my named as " financially responsible party" whether or not i had PoA, i would be potentially responsible for rehab/ nh bills. Thus, if mom was conscious, id have her sign. Jf not, i say, " wait for my brother. He has poa". So far, no one has left us at the curb. But that is where I'dstay.
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Babalou, I do the same thing when it comes to payments. Often Mom doesn't really grasp what she is signing, but I know she is the one responsible for paying, so I tell her just to sign by the X. I wouldn't lead her wrong and it solves any future problem.

ff, what you wrote is true when you have to sign something. I remember having to write PR (personal representative) when my mother was signing as executor of my father's will. And yes, I would tell her just to sign by the X. She ought to be glad that I wouldn't lead her wrong. :)
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shagster1, you don't like your in-laws, and maybe that is fully justified. But presumably you do like your wife. For her sake, try to be supportive of her in this difficult time.
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