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Maybe and maybe not. Once you have met someone with dementia you have met someone with dementia. It depends, cannot be forecast, but must be planned on how to care for her in the future should something happen to you or if you just get worn down with the caring.
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Reply to gladimhere
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People with dementia often revert to primal instincts. Your wife sees you as the one who provides her with everything she needs. If you disappear, she’s afraid you won’t come back and there will be no one to bring her food or otherwise take care of her. I know it can be irritating. Every time my behind gets off the recliner seat, my husband will ask where I’m going or what I’m doing. He needs to know “what time” for everything. He doesn’t have dementia but I find it annoying anyway.

Will it change? Who knows. There are stages of dementia and it’s possible it will. If she seems unduly anxious, check with her doctor for advice.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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When my Mom lost a lot of mobility after a fall, she began calling for me just to make sure I was still around when I was in other parts of the house. Like Ahmijoy says, I have become her security blanket and sometimes she becomes anxious if I was out of sight. Yesterday after spending nearly 6 hours with me in the common room, she put her feet up in the recliner in her room and called out to check on me less than 10 minutes after I left her. I got the VTech DM221-2 Audio Baby Monitor with an intercom feature from Amazon; the monitors include a clip to attach it to your waistband. Now when she calls for me, I can use the intercom to answer immediately and that seems to calm her. Less calling out and the call out has less interruption on what I'm doing (cooking, household chores, etc) than going to her room each time. As she regains mobility, the calling out is lessing too but I expect it to remain at some level.
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Reply to TNtechie
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